Aging, Longevity and Health in the News


Nature: Current issue

???????Politics: Don?t put US?Cuban research at risk
by John D. Van Horn
Re-evaluating evolution in the HIV reservoir
by Daniel I. S. RosenbloomAlison L. HillSarah B. LaskeyRobert F. Siliciano
22 Nov 2017 at 12:00am
ARISING FROMR.Lorenzo-Redondoet al. Nature530, 51?56 (2016); doi:10.1038/nature16933Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), a latent reservoir of replication-competent HIV-1 persists in resting memory CD4+ T cells and precludes a cure. Lorenzo-Redondo et
A neoantigen fitness model predicts tumour response to checkpoint blockade im...
by Marta ?ukszaNadeem RiazVladimir MakarovVinod P. BalachandranMatthew D. HellmannAlexander SolovyovNaiyer A. RizviTaha MerghoubArnold J. LevineTimothy A. ChanJedd D. WolchokBenjamin D. Greenbaum
8 Nov 2017 at 12:00am
Checkpoint blockade immunotherapies enable the host immune system to recognize and destroy tumour cells. Their clinical activity has been correlated with activated T-cell recognition of neoantigens, which are tumour-specific, mutated peptides presented on the surface of cancer cells. Here we present...

Scientific American: Current issue


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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Crossbills were unlikely resident in the Bahamas; thus, there was no populati...
by Craig W. Benkman
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
In PNAS, Steadman and Franklin (1) make the argument that the large reduction in land area and shift in vegetation in the Bahamian Archipelago from ?15?9 ka caused declines and extirpation of two bird species, the Eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) and Hispaniolan crossbill (Loxia megaplaga). Their ev...
Haplotype resolution at the single-cell level [Genetics]
by Andrew C. Adey
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
One of the most rapidly advancing areas in genomics in recent years has been the explosion of platforms to assess properties at the single-cell level. The driving force behind these advancements has been a renaissance of sorts in how we think about the architecture and heterogeneity present in a pop...
HIF and HOIL-1L-mediated PKC{zeta} degradation stabilizes plasma membrane Na,...
by Natalia D. Magnani, Laura A. Dada, Markus A. Queisser, Patricia L. Brazee, Lynn C. Welch, Kishore R. Anekalla, Guofei Zhou, Olga Vagin, Alexander V. Misharin, G. R. Scott Budinger, Kazuhiro Iwai, Aaron J. Ciechanover, Jacob I. Sznajder
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
Organisms have evolved adaptive mechanisms in response to stress for cellular survival. During acute hypoxic stress, cells down-regulate energy-consuming enzymes such as Na,K-ATPase. Within minutes of alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) exposure to hypoxia, protein kinase C zeta (PKC?) phosphorylates the...
Radiocarbon test for demographic events in written and oral history [Anthropo...
by Kevan Edinborough, Marko Porčić, Andrew Martindale, Thomas Jay Brown, Kisha Supernant, Kenneth M. Ames
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
We extend an established simulation-based method to test for significant short-duration (1?2 centuries) demographic events known from one documented historical and one oral historical context. Case study 1 extrapolates population data from the Western historical tradition using historically derived ...
Nasal airflow simulations suggest convergent adaptation in Neanderthals and m...
by S. de Azevedo, M. F. Gonzalez, C. Cintas, V. Ramallo, M. Quinto–Sanchez, F. Marquez, T. Hunemeier, C. Paschetta, A. Ruderman, P. Navarro, B. A. Pazos, C. C. Silva de Cerqueira, O. Velan, F. Ramirez–Rozzi, N. Calvo, H. G. Castro, R. R. Paz, R. Gonzalez–Jose
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
Both modern humans (MHs) and Neanderthals successfully settled across western Eurasian cold-climate landscapes. Among the many adaptations considered as essential to survival in such landscapes, changes in the nasal morphology and/or function aimed to humidify and warm the air before it reaches the ...
Inner Workings: Medical microrobots have potential in surgery, therapy, imagi...
by Stephen Ornes
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
Trypanosoma brucei, the pathogen that causes sleeping sickness, has a clever and insidious trick to help it navigate its hosts? innards: It changes shape depending on its surroundings. In bodily fluids, the bacterium assumes a long and narrow shape to propel itself forward, whipping its tail-like fl...
Oxalate-curcumin-based probe for micro- and macroimaging of reactive oxygen s...
by Jian Yang, Xueli Zhang, Peng Yuan, Jing Yang, Yungen Xu, Jaime Grutzendler, Yihan Shao, Anna Moore, Chongzhao Ran
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
Alzheimer?s disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disorder that has a progression that is closely associated with oxidative stress. It has long been speculated that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in AD brains is much higher than that in healthy brains. However, evidence from liv...
Diminished Ost3-dependent N-glycosylation of the BiP nucleotide exchange fact...
by Kofi L. P. Stevens, Amy L. Black, Kelsi M. Wells, K. Y. Benjamin Yeo, Robert F. L. Steuart, Colin J. Stirling, Benjamin L. Schulz, Carl J. Mousley
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
BiP (Kar2 in yeast) is an essential Hsp70 chaperone and master regulator of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function. BiP?s activity is regulated by its intrinsic ATPase activity that can be stimulated by two different nucleotide exchange factors, Sil1 and Lhs1. Both Sil1 and Lhs1 are glycoproteins, but ...
Efficient gene knockin in axolotl and its use to test the role of satellite c...
by Ji-Feng Fei, Maritta Schuez, Dunja Knapp, Yuka Taniguchi, David N. Drechsel, Elly M. Tanaka
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
Salamanders exhibit extensive regenerative capacities and serve as a unique model in regeneration research. However, due to the lack of targeted gene knockin approaches, it has been difficult to label and manipulate some of the cell populations that are crucial for understanding the mechanisms under...
Myoanatomy of the velvet worm leg revealed by laboratory-based nanofocus X-ra...
by Mark Muller, Ivo de Sena Oliveira, Sebastian Allner, Simone Ferstl, Pidassa Bidola, Korbinian Mechlem, Andreas Fehringer, Lorenz Hehn, Martin Dierolf, Klaus Achterhold, Bernhard Gleich, Jorg U. Hammel, Henry Jahn, Georg Mayer, Franz Pfeiffer
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a powerful noninvasive technique for investigating the inner structure of objects and organisms. However, the resolution of laboratory CT systems is typically limited to the micrometer range. In this paper, we present a table-top nanoCT system in conjunction with st...
Epigenetic mechanisms modulate differences in Drosophila foraging behavior [G...
by Ina Anreiter, Jamie M. Kramer, Marla B. Sokolowski
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
Little is known about how genetic variation and epigenetic marks interact to shape differences in behavior. The foraging (for) gene regulates behavioral differences between the rover and sitter Drosophila melanogaster strains, but the molecular mechanisms through which it does so have remained elusi...
Key amino acid residues conferring enhanced enzyme activity at cold temperatu...
by Victoria J. Laye, Ram Karan, Jong-Myoung Kim, Wolf T. Pecher, Priya DasSarma, Shiladitya DasSarma
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
The Antarctic microorganism Halorubrum lacusprofundi harbors a model polyextremophilic ?-galactosidase that functions in cold, hypersaline conditions. Six amino acid residues potentially important for cold activity were identified by comparative genomics and substituted with evolutionarily conserved...
Metabolic control of regulatory T cell (Treg) survival and function by Lkb1 [...
by Nanhai He, Weiwei Fan, Brian Henriquez, Ruth T. Yu, Annette R. Atkins, Christopher Liddle, Ye Zheng, Michael Downes, Ronald M. Evans
21 Nov 2017 at 1:01pm
The metabolic programs of functionally distinct T cell subsets are tailored to their immunologic activities. While quiescent T cells use oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for energy production, and effector T cells (Teffs) rely on glycolysis for proliferation, the distinct metabolic features of reg...

Science

[Perspectives] What evidence do we need for biomarker qualification?
by Leptak, C., Menetski, J. P., Wagner, J. A., Aubrecht, J., Brady, L., Brumfield, M., Chin, W. W., Hoffmann, S., Kelloff, G., Lavezzari, G., Ranganathan, R., Sauer, J.-M., Sistare, F. D., Zabka, T., Wholley, D.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:49pm

Biomarkers can facilitate all aspects of the drug development process. However, biomarker qualification—the use of a biomarker that is accepted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration—needs a clear, predictable process. We describe a multistakeholder effort including government, industr...


[Research Articles] Prion seeding activity and infectivity in skin samples fr...
by Orru, C. D., Yuan, J., Appleby, B. S., Li, B., Li, Y., Winner, D., Wang, Z., Zhan, Y.-A., Rodgers, M., Rarick, J., Wyza, R. E., Joshi, T., Wang, G.-X., Cohen, M. L., Zhang, S., Groveman, B. R., Petersen, R. B., Ironside, J. W., Quinones-Mateu, M. E., Safar, J. G., Kong, Q., Caughey, B., Zou, W.-Q.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:49pm

Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the most common human prion disease, is transmissible through iatrogenic routes due to abundant infectious prions [misfolded forms of the prion protein (PrPSc)] in the central nervous system (CNS). Some epidemiological studies have associated sCJD risk with...


[Research Articles] Large-scale proteomics identifies MMP-7 as a sentinel of ...
by Lertudomphonwanit, C., Mourya, R., Fei, L., Zhang, Y., Gutta, S., Yang, L., Bove, K. E., Shivakumar, P., Bezerra, J. A.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:49pm

Biliary atresia is a progressive infantile cholangiopathy of complex pathogenesis. Although early diagnosis and surgery are the best predictors of treatment response, current diagnostic approaches are imprecise and time-consuming. We used large-scale, quantitative serum proteomics at the time of dia...


[Research Articles] Targeting STUB1-tissue factor axis normalizes hyperthromb...
by Shashar, M., Belghasem, M. E., Matsuura, S., Walker, J., Richards, S., Alousi, F., Rijal, K., Kolachalama, V. B., Balcells, M., Odagi, M., Nagasawa, K., Henderson, J. M., Gautam, A., Rushmore, R., Francis, J., Kirchhofer, D., Kolandaivelu, K., Sherr, D. H., Edelman, E. R., Ravid, K., Chitalia, V. C.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:49pm

Chronic kidney disease (CKD/uremia) remains vexing because it increases the risk of atherothrombosis and is also associated with bleeding complications on standard antithrombotic/antiplatelet therapies. Although the associations of indolic uremic solutes and vascular wall proteins [such as tissue fa...


[Perspectives] What evidence do we need for biomarker qualification?
by Leptak, C., Menetski, J. P., Wagner, J. A., Aubrecht, J., Brady, L., Brumfield, M., Chin, W. W., Hoffmann, S., Kelloff, G., Lavezzari, G., Ranganathan, R., Sauer, J.-M., Sistare, F. D., Zabka, T., Wholley, D.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:49pm

Biomarkers can facilitate all aspects of the drug development process. However, biomarker qualification—the use of a biomarker that is accepted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration—needs a clear, predictable process. We describe a multistakeholder effort including government, industr...


[Research Articles] Prion seeding activity and infectivity in skin samples fr...
by Orru, C. D., Yuan, J., Appleby, B. S., Li, B., Li, Y., Winner, D., Wang, Z., Zhan, Y.-A., Rodgers, M., Rarick, J., Wyza, R. E., Joshi, T., Wang, G.-X., Cohen, M. L., Zhang, S., Groveman, B. R., Petersen, R. B., Ironside, J. W., Quinones-Mateu, M. E., Safar, J. G., Kong, Q., Caughey, B., Zou, W.-Q.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:49pm

Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the most common human prion disease, is transmissible through iatrogenic routes due to abundant infectious prions [misfolded forms of the prion protein (PrPSc)] in the central nervous system (CNS). Some epidemiological studies have associated sCJD risk with...


[Research Articles] Large-scale proteomics identifies MMP-7 as a sentinel of ...
by Lertudomphonwanit, C., Mourya, R., Fei, L., Zhang, Y., Gutta, S., Yang, L., Bove, K. E., Shivakumar, P., Bezerra, J. A.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:49pm

Biliary atresia is a progressive infantile cholangiopathy of complex pathogenesis. Although early diagnosis and surgery are the best predictors of treatment response, current diagnostic approaches are imprecise and time-consuming. We used large-scale, quantitative serum proteomics at the time of dia...


[Research Articles] Targeting STUB1-tissue factor axis normalizes hyperthromb...
by Shashar, M., Belghasem, M. E., Matsuura, S., Walker, J., Richards, S., Alousi, F., Rijal, K., Kolachalama, V. B., Balcells, M., Odagi, M., Nagasawa, K., Henderson, J. M., Gautam, A., Rushmore, R., Francis, J., Kirchhofer, D., Kolandaivelu, K., Sherr, D. H., Edelman, E. R., Ravid, K., Chitalia, V. C.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:49pm

Chronic kidney disease (CKD/uremia) remains vexing because it increases the risk of atherothrombosis and is also associated with bleeding complications on standard antithrombotic/antiplatelet therapies. Although the associations of indolic uremic solutes and vascular wall proteins [such as tissue fa...


[Editors' Choice] An antioxidant to attenuate aortic aging
by Hine, C.
15 Nov 2017 at 1:54pm

Supplementation with the mitochondrial targeted antioxidant MitoQ for 4 weeks decreased aortic stiffness in old mice.


[Editors' Choice] Vascular endothelial cells take hematopoietic stem cells to...
by Jonas, B. A.
15 Nov 2017 at 1:54pm

The bone marrow vascular endothelial cell niche plays a critical role in regulating hematopoietic system aging by influencing the phenotype of hematopoietic stem cells


[Editors' Choice] Stress CRasHes into fertility command center
by Michopoulos, V.
8 Nov 2017 at 1:50pm

Corticotropin-releasing hormone alters activity of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in an estradiol-dependent manner.


[Research Articles] The FcRn inhibitor rozanolixizumab reduces human serum Ig...
by Kiessling, P., Lledo-Garcia, R., Watanabe, S., Langdon, G., Tran, D., Bari, M., Christodoulou, L., Jones, E., Price, G., Smith, B., Brennan, F., White, I., Jolles, S.
1 Nov 2017 at 1:50pm

Pathogenic immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies characterize some human autoimmune diseases; their high concentration and long half-life are dependent on recycling by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). Inhibition of FcRn is an attractive new treatment concept for IgG-mediated autoimmune diseases. Roz...


[Research Articles] Therapeutic targeting of PGBD5-induced DNA repair depende...
by Henssen, A. G., Reed, C., Jiang, E., Garcia, H. D., von Stebut, J., MacArthur, I. C., Hundsdoerfer, P., Kim, J. H., de Stanchina, E., Kuwahara, Y., Hosoi, H., Ganem, N. J., Dela Cruz, F., Kung, A. L., Schulte, J. H., Petrini, J. H., Kentsis, A.
1 Nov 2017 at 1:50pm

Despite intense efforts, the cure rates of childhood and adult solid tumors are not satisfactory. Resistance to intensive chemotherapy is common, and targets for molecular therapies are largely undefined. We have found that the majority of childhood solid tumors, including rhabdoid tumors, neuroblas...


Synthesis of ultrasmall, homogeneously alloyed, bimetallic nanoparticles on s...
by Wong, A., Liu, Q., Griffin, S., Nicholls, A., Regalbuto, J. R.
23 Nov 2017 at 1:46pm

Supported nanoparticles containing more than one metal have a variety of applications in sensing, catalysis, and biomedicine. Common synthesis techniques for this type of material often result in large, unalloyed nanoparticles that lack the interactions between the two metals that give the particles...


A mitosis-specific and R loop-driven ATR pathway promotes faithful chromosome...
by Kabeche, L., Nguyen, H. D., Buisson, R., Zou, L.
23 Nov 2017 at 1:45pm

The ATR kinase is crucial for DNA damage and replication stress responses. Here, we describe a surprising role of ATR in mitosis. Acute inhibition or degradation of ATR in mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation. The effect of ATR ablation is not due to altered CDK1 activity, DNA damage resp...


Early spectra of the gravitational wave source GW170817: Evolution of a neutr...
by Shappee, B. J., Simon, J. D., Drout, M. R., Piro, A. L., Morrell, N., Prieto, J. L., Kasen, D., Holoien, T. W.- S., Kollmeier, J. A., Kelson, D. D., Coulter, D. A., Foley, R. J., Kilpatrick, C. D., Siebert, M. R., Madore, B. F., Murguia-Berthier, A., Pan, Y.- C., Prochaska, J. X., Ramirez-Ruiz, E., Rest, A., Adams, C., Alatalo, K., Banados, E., Baughman, J., Bernstein, R. A., Bitsakis, T., Boutsia, K., Bravo, J. R., Di Mille, F., Higgs, C. R., Ji, A. P., Maravelias, G., Marshall, J. L., Placco, V. M., Prieto, G., Wan, Z.
16 Oct 2017 at 9:48am

On 17 August 2017, Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) was discovered as the optical counterpart of the binary neutron star gravitational wave event GW170817. We report time-series spectroscopy of SSS17a from 11.75 hours until 8.5 days after merger. Over the first hour of observations the ejecta r...


Light curves of the neutron star merger GW170817/SSS17a: Implications for r-p...
by Drout, M. R., Piro, A. L., Shappee, B. J., Kilpatrick, C. D., Simon, J. D., Contreras, C., Coulter, D. A., Foley, R. J., Siebert, M. R., Morrell, N., Boutsia, K., Di Mille, F., Holoien, T. W.- S., Kasen, D., Kollmeier, J. A., Madore, B. F., Monson, A. J., Murguia-Berthier, A., Pan, Y.- C., Prochaska, J. X., Ramirez-Ruiz, E., Rest, A., Adams, C., Alatalo, K., Banados, E., Baughman, J., Beers, T. C., Bernstein, R. A., Bitsakis, T., Campillay, A., Hansen, T. T., Higgs, C. R., Ji, A. P., Maravelias, G., Marshall, J. L., Bidin, C. M., Prieto, J. L., Rasmussen, K. C., Rojas-Bravo, C., Strom, A. L., Ulloa, N., Vargas-Gonzalez, J., Wan, Z., Whitten, D. D.
16 Oct 2017 at 10:53am

On 17 August 2017, gravitational waves were detected from a binary neutron star merger, GW170817, along with a coincident short gamma-ray burst, GRB170817A. An optical transient source, Swope Supernova Survey 17a (SSS17a), was subsequently identified as the counterpart of this event. We present ultr...


Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a), the optical counterpart to a gravitati...
by Coulter, D. A., Foley, R. J., Kilpatrick, C. D., Drout, M. R., Piro, A. L., Shappee, B. J., Siebert, M. R., Simon, J. D., Ulloa, N., Kasen, D., Madore, B. F., Murguia-Berthier, A., Pan, Y.- C., Prochaska, J. X., Ramirez-Ruiz, E., Rest, A., Rojas-Bravo, C.
16 Oct 2017 at 9:46am

On 2017 August 17, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the Virgo interferometer detected gravitational waves emanating from a binary neutron star merger, GW170817. Nearly simultaneously, the Fermi and INTEGRAL telescopes detected a gamma-ray transient, GRB 170817A. 10....


Metalenses: Versatile multifunctional photonic components
by Khorasaninejad, M., Capasso, F.
5 Oct 2017 at 1:41pm

Recent progress in metasurface designs fueled by advanced-fabrication techniques has led to the realization of ultrathin, lightweight, and flat lenses (metalenses) with unprecedented functionalities. Due to straightforward fabrication, generally requiring a single-step lithography, and possibility o...


Single-proton spin detection by diamond magnetometry
by Loretz, M., Rosskopf, T., Boss, J. M., Pezzagna, S., Meijer, J., Degen, C. L.
8 Jan 2015 at 2:55pm

Extending magnetic resonance imaging to the atomic scale has been a long-standing aspiration, driven by the prospect of directly mapping atomic positions in molecules with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We report detection of individual, isolated proton spins by a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center...


A Single Molecular Spin Valve
by Schon, Emberly, Kirczenow
18 Apr 2002 at 2:53pm

The charge transport through a single benzene-1,4-dithiolate molecule embedded in an inert matrix of insulating alkanethiol molecules and sandwiched between ferromagnetic electrodes is studied as a function of magnetic field. Electronic transport through the device structure shows a pronounced spin ...



British Medical Journal

Low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulceration: pragmatic, ...
by Andrew Jull, Angela Wadham, Chris Bullen, Varsha Parag, Ngaire Kerse, Jill Waters
24 Nov 2017 at 5:31am
Objective To determine the effect of low dose aspirin on ulcer healing in patients with venous leg ulcers.Design Pragmatic, community based, parallel group, double blind, randomised controlled...

New England Journal of Medicine

Biomarkers and Aging in the News

Women advised to sleep on side to help prevent stillbirth
The risk of stillbirth is doubled if women go to sleep on their backs in the last trimester, a study finds.
19 Nov 2017 at 7:03pm
Automated checkouts 'miserable' for elderly shoppers
"Intimidating" checkouts and a lack of seating are "shutting out" the elderly from shops, a charity says.
21 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Risky behaviour
The biohacker movement wants to cure disease without the help of government or big companies
21 Nov 2017 at 6:11pm
How long can you eat those leftovers?
Deep in the recesses of most people's refrigerators lives a half-eaten bottle of salsa, some takeout Chinese food and last week's chicken dinner. Pulling one of those things out, you wonder: Can I eat it? Is it safe? A lot of commercially prepared items, such as sauces and condiments, have best-buy dates on the packaging to ensure flavor, not safety, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
21 Nov 2016 at 12:39am

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Ask Well: Am I at High Risk for a Heart Attack?
Physicians use a number of different factors to assess your risk of having a heart attack or stroke.
24 Nov 2017 at 6:00am
Why Tobacco Companies Are Paying to Tell You Smoking Kills
Court-ordered ads, which will start appearing on Sunday, are ?corrective statements? about the health risks and addictive nature of smoking.
24 Nov 2017 at 5:00am
Dog Owners Live Longer
Owning a dog is linked to a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and death, a Swedish study found.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:06pm
What Turns Black Friday Shoppers Into Raging Hordes?
Social scientists and psychologists are trying to figure out why Black Friday shoppers behave so badly.
21 Nov 2017 at 11:51am
Personal Health: Clearing Up the Confusion About Salt
Excess sodium is responsible for most cases of hypertension, a leading risk factor for heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure.
20 Nov 2017 at 6:00am
The Checkup: How Not to Talk to a Child Who Is Overweight
Doctors walk a difficult line as they try to discuss the fraught subject of weight without increasing the distress that many children already feel.
20 Nov 2017 at 2:46pm

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Melanoma cases rising; young women at greatest risk
Study says that could be because they are more likely to use tanning beds than men.        
2 Apr 2012 at 10:15am
Long use of any hormones raises women's breast cancer risk
A new study tracked about 60,000 nurses and found that use of any kind of hormones for 10 years or more slightly raised the chances.        
1 Apr 2012 at 1:28pm
Radiation may up breast cancer risk in some women
Mammograms might raise the chances of developing cancer in young women whose genes put them at higher risk, a study suggests.        
6 Sep 2012 at 6:30pm
U.N.: Chemicals damaging health and environment
The report by the U.N. Environment Program warned that the increasing production of chemicals is increasing health costs.        
6 Sep 2012 at 11:25am
Study: Ginkgo doesn't prevent Alzheimer's disease
Taking ginkgo biloba didn't prevent Alzheimer's disease in older adults, according to the biggest prevention study in Europe.       
5 Sep 2012 at 10:34pm
University pulls Kinsey Institute app over privacy concerns
The Kinsey Institute released a new mobile app that allows users to report on sexual behavior and experiences.       
5 Sep 2012 at 9:43pm
War might be making young bodies old
A VA study finds that veterans in their 20s and 30s show signs of premature aging.       
5 Sep 2012 at 5:56pm

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Express Scripts to limit opioid prescriptions
Move by largest pharmacy benefits manager to lower addiction risks of painkillers draws objections from AMA
16 Aug 2017 at 7:15pm
Why is knee arthritis twice as common as it used to be?
It's estimated that the lifetime risk of developing the condition is 46 percent
15 Aug 2017 at 3:51pm
Why are cases of knee osteoarthritis on the rise?
A new study found osteoarthritis of the knee is more than twice as common as it was just a few generations ago. It's estimated the lifetime risk of developing this condition is 46 percent, but it is possible to protect your knees. Dr. Jordan Metzl, a sports medicine physician at New York's Hospital for Special Surgery, joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss possible reasons for the increase and what you can do to reduce the symptoms.
15 Aug 2017 at 1:13pm
An alcoholic drink per day can lower risk of cardiovascular disease, study says
Having a glass of wine or beer with dinner tonight may be good for you, according to a new study. Researchers found women who had up to one drink a day and men who averaged up to two a day had a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. Dr. Jon LaPook explains.
14 Aug 2017 at 11:45pm
Morning Rounds: Colon cancer deaths, stroke rates among women
Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss a surprising and concerning rise in colon cancer death rates among younger Americans, a new study that shows stroke rates are going down for men but not women and a new development in the on-going battle with antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
12 Aug 2017 at 12:48pm
How to protect your eyes while viewing the solar eclipse
Millions of Americans will look at the sky on Aug. 21 for the first coast-to-coast total eclipse of the sun in 99 years. But if you want to catch a glimpse, you should take precautions to avoid damaging your vision. Ophthamologist Dr. Christopher Starr joins "CBS This Morning" with more on how to protect your eyes.
11 Aug 2017 at 2:39pm
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm
Three coffees a day linked more to health than harm, scientists say
Drinking coffee was consistently linked with a lower risk of death from all causes, according to a team which collated the findings of 201 previous studies.
23 Nov 2017 at 6:17am
A 60-second breathing exercise to keep you sane
Diffuse family stress and calm down in one minute flat.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:05pm
How to avoid holiday anxiety
If you're withdrawing or micromanaging, there's a strong chance you're under stress this season.
20 Nov 2017 at 6:14pm
7 steps for getting through a panic attack
A blueprint for managing a panic attack as it's happening.
17 Nov 2017 at 4:49pm
Millions of kids at risk of losing health insurance
The deadline for renewing CHIP, the federal health insurance program for low-income children, passed while legislators were busy squabbling over Obamacare.
17 Nov 2017 at 10:23am

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Ask Well: Am I at High Risk for a Heart Attack?
Physicians use a number of different factors to assess your risk of having a heart attack or stroke.
24 Nov 2017 at 6:00am
Why Tobacco Companies Are Paying to Tell You Smoking Kills
Court-ordered ads, which will start appearing on Sunday, are ?corrective statements? about the health risks and addictive nature of smoking.
24 Nov 2017 at 5:00am
Dog Owners Live Longer
Owning a dog is linked to a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and death, a Swedish study found.
22 Nov 2017 at 1:06pm
What Turns Black Friday Shoppers Into Raging Hordes?
Social scientists and psychologists are trying to figure out why Black Friday shoppers behave so badly.
21 Nov 2017 at 11:51am
Personal Health: Clearing Up the Confusion About Salt
Excess sodium is responsible for most cases of hypertension, a leading risk factor for heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure.
20 Nov 2017 at 6:00am
The Checkup: How Not to Talk to a Child Who Is Overweight
Doctors walk a difficult line as they try to discuss the fraught subject of weight without increasing the distress that many children already feel.
20 Nov 2017 at 2:46pm
Behavioral universality across size scales
23 Nov 2017 at 1:41pm
Ten-month-old infants infer the value of goals from the costs of actions

Infants understand that people pursue goals, but how do they learn which goals people prefer? We tested whether infants solve this problem by inverting a mental model of action planning, trading off the costs of acting against the rewards actions bring. After seeing an agent attain two goals equally often at varying costs, infants expected the agent to prefer the goal it attained through costlier actions. These expectations held across three experiments that conveyed cost through different physi...


23 Nov 2017 at 1:41pm
An interferon-independent lncRNA promotes viral replication by modulating cel...

Viruses regulate host metabolic networks to improve their survival. The molecules that are responsive to viral infection and regulate such metabolic changes are hardly known, but are essential for understanding viral infection. Here we identify a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is induced by multiple viruses, but not by type I interferon (IFN-I), and facilitates viral replication in mouse and human cells. In vivo deficiency of lncRNA-ACOD1 (a lncRNA identified by its nearest coding gene Acod1, ...


23 Nov 2017 at 1:41pm
Webinar | CRISPR unleashed: New tools and applications in live-cell imaging
23 Nov 2017 at 1:41pm
Sponsored Collection | Advancing precision medicine: Current and future prote...
23 Nov 2017 at 1:41pm
Male Triathletes May Be Harming Their Hearts
Men who compete in triathlons could be putting their hearts at risk, a new study contends.
21 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Women Still Want Annual Mammograms
Currently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women at average risk for breast cancer be screened every two years, beginning at age 50.
21 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Severe Psoriasis May Make Diabetes More Likely
People with the skin disease psoriasis are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, and the more severe the psoriasis, the greater their risk, a new study finds.
20 Nov 2017 at 5:15pm
Treat Mini-Stroke Quickly To Cut Later Stroke Risk
Prompt treatment of a mini-stroke could reduce the likelihood of having a full-blown stroke by roughly 80 percent, according to a new report.
20 Nov 2017 at 1:15pm
Diabetes, High BP In Pregnancy Can Lead to Issues
If you develop both diabetes and high blood pressure during pregnancy, you face a much higher risk of future trouble than women who only develop one of those conditions while pregnant, researchers report.
20 Nov 2017 at 1:15pm
Heavier Women May Need Mammograms More Often
Overweight or obese women are at greater risk of having breast cancer detected after the tumor has grown large -- over 2 centimeters -- than their slimmer counterparts, the study found.
20 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Advocates Call For Maternal Mortality Solutions
A group of advocates and doctors told congressional staff that more should be done to prevent women from dying during and after childbirth.
17 Nov 2017 at 1:20pm
Calm Parents Help Calm Kids With ADHD
As challenging as it can be to raise a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research offers biological evidence that calm, positive parenting may help these kids master their own emotions and behaviors.
16 Nov 2017 at 7:15pm
Spare the Rod, Spur Better Behavior?
Researchers analyzed data from more than 12,000 children in the United States and found that those who had been spanked by their parents at age 5 had more behavior problems at ages 6 and 8 than those who had never been spanked.
16 Nov 2017 at 7:15pm
Hospital Midwives, Lower C-Section Rates?
Expectant mothers seeking to lower their risk of a cesarean  delivery might want to consider getting a midwife involved, a new study suggests.
16 Nov 2017 at 1:23pm
Death By Birth: Bearing the Burden of Maternal Mortality
When 32-year-old Calista Johnson died 5 days after giving birth this summer, she became part of a troubling trend of moms dying in childbirth in the U.S.
16 Nov 2017 at 11:27am
Breathing Dirty Air May Raise Miscarriage Risk
Chronic exposure seemed to increase that risk by more than 10 percent, according to researchers who tracked hundreds of pregnancies among couples in Michigan and Texas.
16 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
If Dad Has Depression, Kids Might Develop It, Too
Having a father with depression may put teens at a heightened risk for the mental health problem, a new study suggests.
16 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Recall: 7 Hoverboard Brands for Fire Risk
The seven different brands are all subject to the recall after reports of fires.
15 Nov 2017 at 3:46pm
Staying Active May Lower Odds for Glaucoma
For each 10-minute increase in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity a week, the risk of glaucoma fell by 25 percent, according to the study.
15 Nov 2017 at 3:15pm
5 Factors Can Predict Your Heart Health
Five simple health indicators can evaluate a healthy person's risk of heart damage from clogged arteries without drawing blood for medical tests, a new study finds.
15 Nov 2017 at 1:49pm
Sleeping on Side Reduces Stillbirth Risk: Study
New study confirms what doctors have advised for years.
15 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Diabetes Driving Breast Cancer Up in Black Women?
Type 2 diabetes may increase the risk for an aggressive type of breast cancer among black women in the United States, a new study finds.
15 Nov 2017 at 9:15am

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Putting a face on hallucinations aids symptoms of schizophrenia
Interacting with a digital representation of a hallucinated voice can reduce the power it has over people with schizophrenia, and the distress it causes
23 Nov 2017 at 6:30pm
App can tell you if a mosquito is about to give you malaria
AI trained to differentiate the whines of 3500 species of mosquitoes can use your cheap smartphone to tell you if that nearby mosquito will put you at risk of Zika, malaria and dengue fever  
23 Nov 2017 at 10:34am
Light pollution is set to double between now and 2050
The first global ?light census? shows that the area affected by artificial lighting is growing by 2.2 per cent every year, posing risks to wildlife and human health
22 Nov 2017 at 2:00pm
Lightning leaves clouds of radiation and antimatter in its wake
A lightning storm can trigger an atmospheric nuclear reaction that leads to the production of antimatter and radiation, which may pose health risks
17 Nov 2017 at 7:00pm
Weak links in US power grid vulnerable in event of catastrophe
Largest study of 'cascading failures' finds that only a small subset of North America's power grid is at risk from domino-like electrical failure
16 Nov 2017 at 2:00pm
Brain training game linked to lower dementia risk a decade later
Could just ten sessions of brain training be enough to lower your risk of dementia by 29 per cent a decade later? A study suggests so, but some are sceptical
16 Nov 2017 at 9:00am
How long should you let a pregnancy run before being induced?
If your pregnancy runs past its due date, how long should you wait for a natural birth? It may be safer to induce at 40 weeks, for older mums at least
14 Nov 2017 at 2:00pm
Get closer to death to make the most of life
We distance ourselves from dying, but in doing so we could be missing out on the surprising upsides of mortality
13 Nov 2017 at 12:50pm
How social stress makes your brain vulnerable to depression
Bullying and other social stresses may make it easier for inflammatory substances to enter your brain, altering your mood and leaving you susceptible to depression
13 Nov 2017 at 11:00am
Amish Genetic Mutation May Hold Key To Slowing Down Aging
A rare mutation in Amish people may hold the key to slowing down aging.
15 Nov 2017 at 6:19pm
Babies Born With Extra Fingers Are Treated With Risky Procedure, Study Says
When a baby is born with an extra finger, doctors tie it off so the digit dies and falls off. But now a team of doctors say that can be painful for the infant and they offer new advice.
8 Nov 2017 at 4:25pm
Dads With Postpartum Depression: Study Says They Suffer Alone
New dads are at risk for depression just like new moms, but mental health professionals are less likely to detect it and the fathers are less likely to get treatment.
6 Nov 2017 at 1:24pm
Lower Stress With Half The Exercise: Fitness Groups Vs. Working Out Solo
People who exercise in groups do half the work but get much more benefit to their stress levels and mental health.
31 Oct 2017 at 12:50pm
FDA To Examine Claim That Soy Reduces Heart Disease Risk
Soy's health benefits may not be as strong as previously thought.
30 Oct 2017 at 2:55pm
Early Menopause More Likely For Women With Certain Weight Issue, Study Says
Scientists have found a link between weight and a woman?s risk for starting menopause early.
25 Oct 2017 at 7:00pm

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School Safety Tips For Younger Kids
School is back in session, so take some time to go over these important safety tips with your children. This is just the beginning of the conversation, but it's a great place to get started.
21 Jul 2014 at 8:00am
Male Triathletes May Be Harming Their Hearts
Men who compete in triathlons could be putting their hearts at risk, a new study contends.
21 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Women Still Want Annual Mammograms
Currently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women at average risk for breast cancer be screened every two years, beginning at age 50.
21 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Severe Psoriasis May Make Diabetes More Likely
People with the skin disease psoriasis are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, and the more severe the psoriasis, the greater their risk, a new study finds.
20 Nov 2017 at 5:15pm
Treat Mini-Stroke Quickly To Cut Later Stroke Risk
Prompt treatment of a mini-stroke could reduce the likelihood of having a full-blown stroke by roughly 80 percent, according to a new report.
20 Nov 2017 at 1:15pm
Diabetes, High BP In Pregnancy Can Lead to Issues
If you develop both diabetes and high blood pressure during pregnancy, you face a much higher risk of future trouble than women who only develop one of those conditions while pregnant, researchers report.
20 Nov 2017 at 1:15pm
Heavier Women May Need Mammograms More Often
Overweight or obese women are at greater risk of having breast cancer detected after the tumor has grown large -- over 2 centimeters -- than their slimmer counterparts, the study found.
20 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Advocates Call For Maternal Mortality Solutions
A group of advocates and doctors told congressional staff that more should be done to prevent women from dying during and after childbirth.
17 Nov 2017 at 1:20pm
Calm Parents Help Calm Kids With ADHD
As challenging as it can be to raise a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research offers biological evidence that calm, positive parenting may help these kids master their own emotions and behaviors.
16 Nov 2017 at 7:15pm
Spare the Rod, Spur Better Behavior?
Researchers analyzed data from more than 12,000 children in the United States and found that those who had been spanked by their parents at age 5 had more behavior problems at ages 6 and 8 than those who had never been spanked.
16 Nov 2017 at 7:15pm
Hospital Midwives, Lower C-Section Rates?
Expectant mothers seeking to lower their risk of a cesarean  delivery might want to consider getting a midwife involved, a new study suggests.
16 Nov 2017 at 1:23pm
Death By Birth: Bearing the Burden of Maternal Mortality
When 32-year-old Calista Johnson died 5 days after giving birth this summer, she became part of a troubling trend of moms dying in childbirth in the U.S.
16 Nov 2017 at 11:27am
Breathing Dirty Air May Raise Miscarriage Risk
Chronic exposure seemed to increase that risk by more than 10 percent, according to researchers who tracked hundreds of pregnancies among couples in Michigan and Texas.
16 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
If Dad Has Depression, Kids Might Develop It, Too
Having a father with depression may put teens at a heightened risk for the mental health problem, a new study suggests.
16 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Recall: 7 Hoverboard Brands for Fire Risk
The seven different brands are all subject to the recall after reports of fires.
15 Nov 2017 at 3:46pm
Staying Active May Lower Odds for Glaucoma
For each 10-minute increase in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity a week, the risk of glaucoma fell by 25 percent, according to the study.
15 Nov 2017 at 3:15pm
5 Factors Can Predict Your Heart Health
Five simple health indicators can evaluate a healthy person's risk of heart damage from clogged arteries without drawing blood for medical tests, a new study finds.
15 Nov 2017 at 1:49pm
Sleeping on Side Reduces Stillbirth Risk: Study
New study confirms what doctors have advised for years.
15 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Diabetes Driving Breast Cancer Up in Black Women?
Type 2 diabetes may increase the risk for an aggressive type of breast cancer among black women in the United States, a new study finds.
15 Nov 2017 at 9:15am
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm

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This supernova was supposed to die ? until it got brighter

Talk about going out with a bang ? and then another bang. Astronomers at Las Cumbres Observatory have discovered a supernova that has been shining for years instead of mere months, surviving far beyond its expected lifespan.

The strange and still-going stellar explosion, described in the journal...


9 Nov 2017 at 2:35pm
Survey reveals surprising mismatch between perception and reality of obesity ...

Nearly 40% of American adults and 20% of children carry enough extra weight to warrant a diagnosis of obesity. That?s the highest obesity rate among the world?s affluent nations, and it?s already shortening Americans? lifespans by driving up rates of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancers, arthritis...


3 Nov 2017 at 8:00am

NIH Press Releases



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NIH News Release
NIH News Release
News releases from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Affective neuroscience expert Dr. Richard Davidson to speak on meditation res...
20 Apr 2016 at 1:00pm
NCCIH presents ?Change Your Brain by Transforming Your Mind?.


NIH study finds factors that may influence influenza vaccine effectiveness
19 Apr 2016 at 8:30pm
Long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited.


Statement on Review of NIH Sterile Production Facilities
19 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Production suspended in two facilities.


NCI opens online platform to submit ideas about research for Cancer Moonshot
18 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Submissions will be considered by a panel of scientific experts and patient advocates.


Healthy diet may reduce high blood pressure risk after gestational diabetes, ...
18 Apr 2016 at 8:00pm
Women who have had gestational diabetes may indeed benefit from a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.


NIH launches research program to reduce health disparities in surgical outcomes
18 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
The initiative will involve collaborations among several NIH institutes and centers, AHRQ.


Islet transplantation restores blood sugar awareness and control in type 1 di...
18 Apr 2016 at 2:00pm
NIH-funded study lays groundwork for potential application submission to FDA for licensure of islet preparation.


Greenness around homes linked to lower mortality
15 Apr 2016 at 4:00pm
Researchers found the biggest differences in death rates from kidney disease, respiratory disease, and cancer.


NIH sequences genome of a fungus that causes life-threatening pneumonia
11 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
Pneumocystis was one of the first infections that led to the initial recognition of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.


New role identified for scars at the site of injured spinal cord
7 Apr 2016 at 7:00pm
NIH-funded mouse study suggests scar formation may help, not hinder, nerve regrowth.


NIH Announcements


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NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA)
Weekly Funding Opportunities and Policy Notices from the National Institutes of Health.

Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Conformanc...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:52am
Notice NOT-FD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Reminder: NHLBI FY2017 Small Business Topics of Special Interest (TOSI) for t...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:48am
Notice NOT-HL-16-479 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of Extension of the Expiration Date for PA-16-282 Developing New Clini...
12 Dec 2016 at 1:25am
Notice NOT-HS-17-005 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of an Informational Webinar for RFA-NS-17-017 "Frontotemporal Degenera...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:09am
Notice NOT-NS-17-010 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Pragmatic Clinical Trials Demonstr...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit UG3/UH3 phased cooperative agreement research applications to conduct efficient, large-scale pragmatic clinical trial Demonstration Projects within the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other co-morbid conditions in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. This program will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program. Awards made under this FOA will initially support a two-year milestone-driven planning phase (UG3), with possible transition to a pragmatic trial Demonstration Project implementation phase (UH3). UG3 projects that have met the scientific milestone and feasibility requirements may transition to the UH3 phase. The UG3/UH3 application must be submitted as a single application, following the instructions described in this FOA. The overall goal of this initiative, jointly supported by the NIH, DoD, and VA, is to develop the capacity to implement cost-effective large-scale clinical research in military and veteran health care delivery organizations focusing on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other comorbid conditions. The NIH, DoD, and VA expect to: establish a Coordinating Center that will provide national leadership and technical expertise for all aspects of health care system (HCS_- focused research including assistance to UG3/UH3 grant applicants. Primary outcomes of treatment interventions include assessing pain and pain reduction, ability to function in daily life, quality of life, and medication usage/reduction/discontinuation. Secondary outcomes focusing on assessing comorbid conditions or those co-occurring with high frequency in this population are also of interest under the FOA.
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Coordinating Center (U24)
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit applications for a Coordinating Center (CC) to provide national leadership for the NIH-DoD-VA Health Care Systems (HCS) Research Collaboratory program on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and comorbidities in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. For brevity, this initiative will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory. Coordinating Center applicants will need to: 1) develop, adapt, and adopt technical and policy guidelines and best practices for the effective conduct of research in partnership with health care systems focused on military personnel, veterans, and their families; 2) work collaboratively with and provide technical, design, and other support to Demonstration Project teams, to develop and implement a pragmatic trial protocol; and 3) disseminate widely Collaboratory-endorsed policies and best practices and lessons learned in the Demonstration Projects for implementing research within health care settings. The Coordinating Center will also serve as the central resource for the activities of the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program, including providing administrative support for a Steering Committee and its subcommittees.
Innovations for Healthy Living - Improving Population Health and Eliminating ...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes and in preventing disease and improving health in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Technologies for Improving Minority Health and Eliminating Health Disparities...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Novel Analytical Approaches for Metabolomics Data (R03)
12 Dec 2016 at 9:57am
Funding Opportunity RFA-RM-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this small research grant Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to foster collaboration between computational scientists, metabolomics experts, and biomedical researchers in developing, piloting, and/or validating novel bioinformatic approaches that address current analytical hurdles in metabolomics data. A goal of providing powerful approaches that will be useful to biomedical researchers, as well as bioinformaticians, is particularly encouraged. Projects are not intended to supplement ongoing metabolomics analyses, but to provide a tool for broader use by the biomedical research community. Projects are expected to use existing, publicly available metabolomics data and complement the efforts and resources of the Common Fund Metabolomics Program.
Utilizing Health Information Technology to Scale and Spread Successful Practi...
12 Dec 2016 at 10:39am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-077 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites R18 grant applications for research that demonstrates how health information technology (IT) can improve patient-centered health outcomes and quality of care in primary care and other ambulatory settings through the scale and spread of successful, health IT-enabled practice models that use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to achieve these objectives.
Administrative Supplement for Research on Sex/Gender Influences (Admin Supp)
12 Dec 2016 at 1:27am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-078 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) announces the availability of administrative supplements to support research highlighting the impact of sex/gender influences and/or sex and gender factors in human health and illness, including basic, preclinical, clinical and behavioral studies. Of special interest are studies relevant to understanding the significance of biological sex on cells and tissue explants; comparative studies of male and female tissues, organ systems and physiological systems; sex-based comparisons of pathophysiology, biomarkers, gene expression, clinical presentation and prevention and treatment of diseases. The most robust experimental designs include consideration of both sex and gender; therefore, applications proposing to investigate the influence of both sex and gender factors are highly encouraged. The proposed research must address at least one objective from Goals 1 through 3 of the NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research.
Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 10:19am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-074 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $50,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $600,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 11:23am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-075 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-funded investigators to purchase or upgrade scientific instruments necessary to carry out animal experiments in all areas of biomedical research supported by the NIH. Applicants may request clusters of commercially available instruments configured as specialized integrated systems or as series of instruments to support a thematic workflow in a well-defined area of research using animals or related materials. Priority will be given to specialized clusters of instruments and to uniquely configured systems to support innovative and potentially transformative investigations. Requests for a single instrument will be considered only if the instrument is to be placed in a barrier facility. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) supports requests for state-of-the art commercially available technologies needed for NIH-funded research using any vertebrate and invertebrate animal species. It is expected that the use of the awarded instruments will enhance the scientific rigor of animal research and improve the reproducibility of experimental outcomes. One item of the requested instrumentation must cost at least $50,000. No instrument in a cluster can cost less than $20,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $750,000.
High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 12:15pm
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-076 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $600,001. The maximum award is $2,000,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffraction systems, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and confocal microscopes, cell-sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Increasing the Use of Medications for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders ...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:26am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-079 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages health services research designed to increase the public health impact of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for the treatment of alcohol use disorder. Significant progress is needed in developing generalizable, scalable, cost-effective strategies to move these evidence-based interventions into the mainstream of alcohol use disorder treatment, in both general medical and specialty care settings. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) seeks applications to conduct hypothesis-driven research to identify effective methods for increasing the utilization of currently-available medications, by addressing their acceptability (to prescribers and patients), perceived effectiveness, affordability, and feasibility of use within existing care delivery systems.