Aging, Longevity and Health in the News


Nature: Current issue

Engineered cell therapy for cancer gets thumbs up from FDA advisers
by Heidi Ledford
12 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
Treatment shows promise in young people with leukaemia, but safety risks abound.
History: Tracking down a doomed Arctic expedition
by Daniel Cressey
19 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
Daniel Cressey surveys the remains of John Franklin's fatal 1845 voyage.
Imaging techniques: X-rays used to watch spins in 3D
by Peter Fischer
19 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
Complex nanoscale magnetization patterns have been resolved in 3D using advanced X-ray microscopy. This could spur the design of magnetic devices that have unique properties and functions. See Letter p.328
Cancer: Keeping it real to kill glioblastoma
by Paul A. Northcott
5 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
The results of in vitro and in vivo screens to identify genes that are essential for the survival of a type of brain cancer show almost no overlap, underlining the need for caution when interpreting in vitro studies. See Letter p355.
Three-dimensional magnetization structures revealed with X-ray vector nanotom...
by Claire DonnellyManuel Guizar-SicairosValerio ScagnoliSebastian GligaMirko HollerJörg RaabeLaura J. Heyderman
19 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
In soft ferromagnetic materials, the smoothly varying magnetization leads to the formation of fundamental patterns such as domains, vortices and domain walls. These have been studied extensively in thin films of thicknesses up to around 200?nanometres, in which the magnetization is accessible with c...
Large-scale physical activity data reveal worldwide activity inequality
by Tim AlthoffRok Sosi?Jennifer L. HicksAbby C. KingScott L. DelpJure Leskovec
10 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
To be able to curb the global pandemic of physical inactivity and the associated 5.3 million deaths per year, we need to understand the basic principles that govern physical activity. However, there is a lack of large-scale measurements of physical activity patterns across free-living populations wo...
Infant viewing of social scenes is under genetic control and is atypical in a...
by John N. ConstantinoStefanie Kennon-McGillClaire WeichselbaumNatasha MarrusAlyzeh HaiderAnne L. GlowinskiScott GillespieCheryl KlaimanAmi KlinWarren Jones
12 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
Long before infants reach, crawl or walk, they explore the world by looking: they look to learn and to engage, giving preferential attention to social stimuli, including faces, face-like stimuli and biological motion. This capacity?social visual engagement?shapes typical infant development from birt...
Transcription elongation factors represent in vivo cancer dependencies in gli...
by Tyler E. MillerBrian B. LiauLisa C. WallaceAndrew R. MortonQi XieDeobrat DixitDaniel C. FactorLeo J. Y. KimJames J. MorrowQiulian WuStephen C. MackChristopher G. HubertShawn M. GillespieWilliam A. FlavahanThomas HoffmannRohit ThummalapalliMichael T. HemannPatrick J. PaddisonCraig M. HorbinskiJohannes ZuberPeter C. ScacheriBradley E. BernsteinPaul J. TesarJeremy N. Rich
5 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
Glioblastoma is a universally lethal cancer with a median survival time of approximately 15 months. Despite substantial efforts to define druggable targets, there are no therapeutic options that notably extend the lifespan of patients with glioblastoma. While previous work has largely focused on in ...

Scientific American: Current issue

The Right to Cognitive Liberty
by Marcello Ienca
16 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
A new type of brain-imaging technology could expose?even change?our private thoughts
Mending a Broken Heart
by Dina Fine Maron
16 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
An injectable, stem cell?based therapy for heart failure is getting a gold-standard trial
Plastic-Eating Worms
by Matthew Sedacca
16 Jul 2017 at 12:00am
Larvae that consume and degrade polyethylene could inspire new industrial tools

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Hepatic ZIP14-mediated zinc transport is required for adaptation to endoplasm...
by Min-Hyun Kim, Tolunay B. Aydemir, Jinhee Kim, Robert J. Cousins
18 Jul 2017 at 12:05pm
Extensive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress damages the liver, causing apoptosis and steatosis despite the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Restriction of zinc from cells can induce ER stress, indicating that zinc is essential to maintain normal ER function. However, a role for zin...
Changes in E-cadherin rigidity sensing regulate cell adhesion [Cell Biology]
by Caitlin Collins, Aleksandra K. Denisin, Beth L. Pruitt, W. James Nelson
18 Jul 2017 at 12:05pm
Mechanical cues are sensed and transduced by cell adhesion complexes to regulate diverse cell behaviors. Extracellular matrix (ECM) rigidity sensing by integrin adhesions has been well studied, but rigidity sensing by cadherins during cell adhesion is largely unexplored. Using mechanically tunable p...
E-cadherin and LGN align epithelial cell divisions with tissue tension indepe...
by Kevin C. Hart, Jiongyi Tan, Kathleen A. Siemers, Joo Yong Sim, Beth L. Pruitt, W. James Nelson, Martijn Gloerich
18 Jul 2017 at 12:05pm
Tissue morphogenesis requires the coordinated regulation of cellular behavior, which includes the orientation of cell division that defines the position of daughter cells in the tissue. Cell division orientation is instructed by biochemical and mechanical signals from the local tissue environment, b...
FANCM, BRCA1, and BLM cooperatively resolve the replication stress at the ALT...
by Xiaolei Pan, William C. Drosopoulos, Louisa Sethi, Advaitha Madireddy, Carl L. Schildkraut, Dong Zhang
18 Jul 2017 at 12:05pm
In the mammalian genome, certain genomic loci/regions pose greater challenges to the DNA replication machinery (i.e., the replisome) than others. Such known genomic loci/regions include centromeres, common fragile sites, subtelomeres, and telomeres. However, the detailed mechanism of how mammalian c...
High serum serotonin in sudden infant death syndrome [Medical Sciences]
by Robin L. Haynes, Andrew L. Frelinger III, Emma K. Giles, Richard D. Goldstein, Hoa Tran, Harry P. Kozakewich, Elisabeth A. Haas, Anja J. Gerrits, Othon J. Mena, Felicia L. Trachtenberg, David S. Paterson, Gerard T. Berry, Khosrow Adeli, Hannah C. Kinney, Alan D. Michelson
18 Jul 2017 at 12:05pm
Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the leading cause of postneonatal infant mortality, likely comprises heterogeneous disorders with the common phenotype of sudden death without explanation upon postmortem investigation. Previously, we reported that ?40% of SIDS deaths are associated with abnormal...
Endogenous orienting in the archer fish [Neuroscience]
by William Saban, Liora Sekely, Raymond M. Klein, Shai Gabay
18 Jul 2017 at 12:05pm
The literature has long emphasized the neocortex?s role in volitional processes. In this work, we examined endogenous orienting in an evolutionarily older species, the archer fish, which lacks neocortex-like cells. We used Posner?s classic endogenous cuing task, in which a centrally presented, spati...
Improved color constancy in honey bees enabled by parallel visual projections...
by Jair E. Garcia, Yu-Shan Hung, Andrew D. Greentree, Marcello G. P. Rosa, John A. Endler, Adrian G. Dyer
18 Jul 2017 at 12:05pm
How can a pollinator, like the honey bee, perceive the same colors on visited flowers, despite continuous and rapid changes in ambient illumination and background color? A hundred years ago, von Kries proposed an elegant solution to this problem, color constancy, which is currently incorporated in m...
Quantification of habitat fragmentation reveals extinction risk in terrestria...
by Kevin R. Crooks, Christopher L. Burdett, David M. Theobald, Sarah R. B. King, Moreno Di Marco, Carlo Rondinini, Luigi Boitani
18 Jul 2017 at 12:05pm
Although habitat fragmentation is often assumed to be a primary driver of extinction, global patterns of fragmentation and its relationship to extinction risk have not been consistently quantified for any major animal taxon. We developed high-resolution habitat fragmentation models and used phylogen...
Global priorities for conservation across multiple dimensions of mammalian di...
by Fernanda T. Brum, Catherine H. Graham, Gabriel C. Costa, S. Blair Hedges, Caterina Penone, Volker C. Radeloff, Carlo Rondinini, Rafael Loyola, Ana D. Davidson
18 Jul 2017 at 12:05pm
Conservation priorities that are based on species distribution, endemism, and vulnerability may underrepresent biologically unique species as well as their functional roles and evolutionary histories. To ensure that priorities are biologically comprehensive, multiple dimensions of diversity must be ...
Correction for Bahari-Javan et al., HDAC1 links early life stress to schizoph...
18 Jul 2017 at 12:05pm
NEUROSCIENCE Correction for ?HDAC1 links early life stress to schizophrenia-like phenotypes,? by Sanaz Bahari-Javan, Hristo Varbanov, Rashi Halder, Eva Benito, Lalit Kaurani, Susanne Burkhardt, Heike Anderson-Schmidt, Ion Anghelescu, Monika Budde, Roman M. Stilling, Joan Costa, Juan Medina, Detlef E...

Science

[Research Articles] A single dose of peripherally infused EGFRvIII-directed C...
by ORourke, D. M., Nasrallah, M. P., Desai, A., Melenhorst, J. J., Mansfield, K., Morrissette, J. J. D., Martinez-Lage, M., Brem, S., Maloney, E., Shen, A., Isaacs, R., Mohan, S., Plesa, G., Lacey, S. F., Navenot, J.-M., Zheng, Z., Levine, B. L., Okada, H., June, C. H., Brogdon, J. L., Maus, M. V.
19 Jul 2017 at 3:50pm

We conducted a first-in-human study of intravenous delivery of a single dose of autologous T cells redirected to the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) mutation by a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We report our findings on the first 10 recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) patients tre...


[Research Articles] A single dose of peripherally infused EGFRvIII-directed C...
by ORourke, D. M., Nasrallah, M. P., Desai, A., Melenhorst, J. J., Mansfield, K., Morrissette, J. J. D., Martinez-Lage, M., Brem, S., Maloney, E., Shen, A., Isaacs, R., Mohan, S., Plesa, G., Lacey, S. F., Navenot, J.-M., Zheng, Z., Levine, B. L., Okada, H., June, C. H., Brogdon, J. L., Maus, M. V.
19 Jul 2017 at 3:50pm

We conducted a first-in-human study of intravenous delivery of a single dose of autologous T cells redirected to the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) mutation by a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We report our findings on the first 10 recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) patients tre...


[Editors' Choice] On the origin of relapse in AML
by Jonas, B. A.
12 Jul 2017 at 1:47pm

Preexisting therapy-resistant leukemia stem cell populations underlie the cellular origin of relapse in acute myeloid leukemia.


[Perspectives] Marketing of unproven stem cell-based interventions: A call to...
by Sipp, D., Caulfield, T., Kaye, J., Barfoot, J., Blackburn, C., Chan, S., De Luca, M., Kent, A., McCabe, C., Munsie, M., Sleeboom-Faulkner, M., Sugarman, J., van Zimmeren, E., Zarzeczny, A., Rasko, J. E. J.
5 Jul 2017 at 1:48pm

Commercial promotion of unsupported therapeutic uses of stem cells is a global problem that has proven resistant to regulatory efforts. Here, we suggest a coordinated approach at the national and international levels focused on engagement, harmonization, and enforcement to reduce the risks associate...


[Editors' Choice] Enduring scars of cocaine
by Michopoulos, V.
5 Jul 2017 at 1:48pm

Long-lasting metabolic changes within the brain upon abstinence from cocaine self-administration may increase risk for relapse.


[Research Articles] Broad-spectrum antiviral GS-5734 inhibits both epidemic a...
by Sheahan, T. P., Sims, A. C., Graham, R. L., Menachery, V. D., Gralinski, L. E., Case, J. B., Leist, S. R., Pyrc, K., Feng, J. Y., Trantcheva, I., Bannister, R., Park, Y., Babusis, D., Clarke, M. O., Mackman, R. L., Spahn, J. E., Palmiotti, C. A., Siegel, D., Ray, A. S., Cihlar, T., Jordan, R., Denison, M. R., Baric, R. S.
28 Jun 2017 at 1:50pm

Emerging viral infections are difficult to control because heterogeneous members periodically cycle in and out of humans and zoonotic hosts, complicating the development of specific antiviral therapies and vaccines. Coronaviruses (CoVs) have a proclivity to spread rapidly into new host species causi...


[Research Articles] Linker proteins restore basement membrane and correct LAM...
by Reinhard, J. R., Lin, S., McKee, K. K., Meinen, S., Crosson, S. C., Sury, M., Hobbs, S., Maier, G., Yurchenco, P. D., Rüegg, M. A.
28 Jun 2017 at 1:50pm

LAMA2-related muscular dystrophy (LAMA2 MD or MDC1A) is the most frequent form of early-onset, fatal congenital muscular dystrophies. It is caused by mutations in LAMA2, the gene encoding laminin-α2, the long arm of the heterotrimeric (α2, β1, and 1) basement membrane protein lamini...


[Editors' Choice] Surfs up for ER stress
by Haspel, J.
28 Jun 2017 at 1:50pm

A new type of biological clock regulates the unfolded protein response.


[Reports] Genetic and epigenetic inactivation of SESTRIN1 controls mTORC1 and...
by Oricchio, E., Katanayeva, N., Donaldson, M. C., Sungalee, S., Pasion, J. P., Beguelin, W., Battistello, E., Sanghvi, V. R., Jiang, M., Jiang, Y., Teater, M., Parmigiani, A., Budanov, A. V., Chan, F. C., Shah, S. P., Kridel, R., Melnick, A. M., Ciriello, G., Wendel, H.-G.
28 Jun 2017 at 1:50pm

Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an incurable form of B cell lymphoma. Genomic studies have cataloged common genetic lesions in FL such as translocation t(14;18), frequent losses of chromosome 6q, and mutations in epigenetic regulators such as EZH2. Using a focused genetic screen, we identified SESTRIN1 ...


Reconfiguration of DNA molecular arrays driven by information relay
by Song, J., Li, Z., Wang, P., Meyer, T., Mao, C., Ke, Y.
22 Jun 2017 at 1:36pm

Information relay at the molecular level is an essential phenomenon in numerous chemical and biological processes, such as intricate signaling cascades. One key challenge in synthetic molecular self-assembly is to construct artificial structures that imitate these complex behaviors in controllable s...


Single-proton spin detection by diamond magnetometry
by Loretz, M., Rosskopf, T., Boss, J. M., Pezzagna, S., Meijer, J., Degen, C. L.
8 Jan 2015 at 2:55pm

Extending magnetic resonance imaging to the atomic scale has been a long-standing aspiration, driven by the prospect of directly mapping atomic positions in molecules with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We report detection of individual, isolated proton spins by a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center...


A Single Molecular Spin Valve
by Schon, Emberly, Kirczenow
18 Apr 2002 at 2:53pm

The charge transport through a single benzene-1,4-dithiolate molecule embedded in an inert matrix of insulating alkanethiol molecules and sandwiched between ferromagnetic electrodes is studied as a function of magnetic field. Electronic transport through the device structure shows a pronounced spin ...



British Medical Journal

“Independent” reanalysis of landmark starch solutions trial was...
by Peter Doshi
21 Jul 2017 at 12:24pm
Academics who refused calls to share the data underlying their landmark trial that triggered the downfall of starches for fluid resuscitation have announced an ?independent reanalysis,? which...

New England Journal of Medicine

Biomarkers and Aging in the News

Nine lifestyle changes can reduce dementia risk, study says
They include hearing loss, smoking, and not finishing secondary education, a study says.
20 Jul 2017 at 5:51am
London paramedic has liquid thrown in face by masked men
She was flagged down by three men who appeared to be in distress before being attacked.
18 Jul 2017 at 6:42am
Children 'exercise less as they get older'
The number of children doing an hour of exercise a day falls by 40% between the ages of five and 12.
16 Jul 2017 at 7:00pm
'Still hear screaming'
Three weeks on from the Grenfell Tower fire, many local people are still suffering "acute stress".
9 Jul 2017 at 5:37pm
How bulimics' brains are different
The brains of women with bulimia respond differently to stress and food compared with women without the eating disorder, according to two separate MRI studies that published this month.
18 Jul 2017 at 10:07am
This diet might prevent dementia
Following a Mediterranean style diet may lower your risk of dementia by a third, according to new research.
17 Jul 2017 at 12:52pm

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The New Old Age: Another Possible Indignity of Age: Arrest
Confrontations with police officers are increasing as the ranks of older Americans swell and dementia becomes more widespread.
21 Jul 2017 at 11:48am
In South Asian Social Castes, a Living Lab for Genetic Disease
Millenniums of marriages within well-defined subgroups in South Asia have created many populations with higher risks of recessive disease, according to new research.
17 Jul 2017 at 11:00am
Ask Well: Should We Be Buying Iodized Salt?
Most Americans and Europeans who eat a varied diet get enough iodine even if they don?t use iodized salt, though pregnant women are at risk.
21 Jul 2017 at 6:00am
Long Workdays May Be Bad for Your Heart
Compared with people who worked 35 to 40 hours a week, those who worked more than 55 hours had a 40 percent increased risk of atrial fibrillation.
20 Jul 2017 at 11:00am
Doctors: The Risk of Exertional Heatstroke to Young Athletes
Banning two-a-day summer practices in high schools could help minimize the danger.
20 Jul 2017 at 6:00am

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Melanoma cases rising; young women at greatest risk
Study says that could be because they are more likely to use tanning beds than men.        
2 Apr 2012 at 10:15am
Long use of any hormones raises women's breast cancer risk
A new study tracked about 60,000 nurses and found that use of any kind of hormones for 10 years or more slightly raised the chances.        
1 Apr 2012 at 1:28pm
Radiation may up breast cancer risk in some women
Mammograms might raise the chances of developing cancer in young women whose genes put them at higher risk, a study suggests.        
6 Sep 2012 at 6:30pm
U.N.: Chemicals damaging health and environment
The report by the U.N. Environment Program warned that the increasing production of chemicals is increasing health costs.        
6 Sep 2012 at 11:25am
Study: Ginkgo doesn't prevent Alzheimer's disease
Taking ginkgo biloba didn't prevent Alzheimer's disease in older adults, according to the biggest prevention study in Europe.       
5 Sep 2012 at 10:34pm
University pulls Kinsey Institute app over privacy concerns
The Kinsey Institute released a new mobile app that allows users to report on sexual behavior and experiences.       
5 Sep 2012 at 9:43pm
War might be making young bodies old
A VA study finds that veterans in their 20s and 30s show signs of premature aging.       
5 Sep 2012 at 5:56pm
New report outlines lifestyle changes to prevent dementia
A new report shows that preventing dementia can start early in life. Certain lifestyle changes such as maximizing education, aggressively treating hypertension and managing depression can have a dramatic impact in preventing the disease. Dr. Jon LaPook has more.
21 Jul 2017 at 11:42pm
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm
Son Charts Mom's Heartbreaking Descent Into Dementia
Molly Daley's battle with Lewy body dementia ? the second most common form of the disease in older adults after Alzheimer's ? has been painstakingly chronicled by her son.
19 Jul 2017 at 12:18pm
8 Small Summer Diet Swaps that Add Up
A new study found that adding micro-changes to your menu significantly reduces the risk of early death.
17 Jul 2017 at 2:09pm

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The New Old Age: Another Possible Indignity of Age: Arrest
Confrontations with police officers are increasing as the ranks of older Americans swell and dementia becomes more widespread.
21 Jul 2017 at 11:48am
In South Asian Social Castes, a Living Lab for Genetic Disease
Millenniums of marriages within well-defined subgroups in South Asia have created many populations with higher risks of recessive disease, according to new research.
17 Jul 2017 at 11:00am
Ask Well: Should We Be Buying Iodized Salt?
Most Americans and Europeans who eat a varied diet get enough iodine even if they don?t use iodized salt, though pregnant women are at risk.
21 Jul 2017 at 6:00am
Long Workdays May Be Bad for Your Heart
Compared with people who worked 35 to 40 hours a week, those who worked more than 55 hours had a 40 percent increased risk of atrial fibrillation.
20 Jul 2017 at 11:00am
Doctors: The Risk of Exertional Heatstroke to Young Athletes
Banning two-a-day summer practices in high schools could help minimize the danger.
20 Jul 2017 at 6:00am
Fringe on the brink: Intertidal reefs at risk
20 Jul 2017 at 1:23pm
Ratchet-like polypeptide translocation mechanism of the AAA+ disaggregase Hsp104

Hsp100 polypeptide translocases are conserved members of the AAA+ family (adenosine triphosphatases associated with diverse cellular activities) that maintain proteostasis by unfolding aberrant and toxic proteins for refolding or proteolytic degradation. The Hsp104 disaggregase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae solubilizes stress-induced amorphous aggregates and amyloids. The structural basis for substrate recognition and translocation is unknown. Using a model substrate (casein), we report cryo&nda...


20 Jul 2017 at 1:23pm
Estrogen May Influence Women's Depression Risk
Early menstruation, more frequent periods seem to make sad times less likely, researchers suggest
21 Jul 2017 at 10:15am
Nine Risk Factors Boost Dementia Risk: Study
Reducing mid-life hearing loss might make the biggest difference
20 Jul 2017 at 10:15am
As Weight Creeps Up, So Does Risk of Heart Failure
But losing a few pounds might help decrease the damage, cardiologist suggests
19 Jul 2017 at 6:15pm
Early Menopause May Be Tied to Type 2 Diabetes
When periods stop before 40, risk is 4 times greater compared to late menopause, study suggests
19 Jul 2017 at 10:15am
FAQ: What To Know About Dangerous Vibrio Bacteria
Understanding the risks, symptoms and treatment for disease bacteria found in saltwater and raw fish can cause.
14 Jul 2017 at 2:40pm
'Observation' Best for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer
20-year study found little difference in death rates, more complications with surgery
13 Jul 2017 at 10:15am
Breast-Feeding May Lower Risk of MS, Study Says
Benefits reported for women who nursed 15 months or more
12 Jul 2017 at 6:15pm

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Molecule induces lifesaving sleep in worms
Sometimes, a nematode worm just needs to take a nap. In fact, its life may depend on it. New research has identified a protein that promotes a sleep-like state in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Without the snooze-inducing molecule, worms are more likely to die when confronted with stressful conditions.
7 Mar 2016 at 10:57am
Group identifications affect likelihood of teenagers smoking, drinking and ta...
Teenagers who interact positively with their family, school and friends are far less likely to smoke, binge drink and use cannabis than peers who fail to identify with these social groups, according to research. The research team surveyed more than 1000 high school pupils aged 13-17 from the Fife area. The results showed that group identification protects against adverse health behavior, with levels of identification with family, school and friendship groups predicting the likelihood of teenager...
7 Mar 2016 at 9:36am
Goldilocks had it right: When it comes to sleep, neither too much or too litt...
Too much or too little sleep is linked with an increased risk of certain types of cardiovascular disease. Women and the elderly are particularly at risk, report scientists in a new report.
7 Mar 2016 at 9:36am
Technology to analyze customer behavior in stores
Proximus has developed technology for creating a map of how we shop in the supermarket thanks to a chip that is built into shopping carts and baskets.
7 Mar 2016 at 9:35am
Time to rethink your vegetable oil?
Risk of heart disease and diabetes may be lowered by a diet higher in a lipid found in grapeseed and other oils, but not in olive oil, a new study suggests. This finding could have obvious implications in preventing heart disease and diabetes, but also could be important for older adults because higher lean body mass can contribute to a longer life with more independence.
7 Mar 2016 at 9:23am
Young baseball players could benefit from preseason arm injury prevention pro...
Preseason prevention programs are beneficial to young baseball pitchers, according to new research. The study, the first to analyze a well-monitored preseason training program, showed numerous arm flexibility and strength improvements in participating athletes that could ultimately diminish the risk of injuries.
5 Mar 2016 at 11:18am
Latin dancing may have health benefits for older adults
A Latin dance program was more effective than health education alone in boosting older Latinos' physical fitness. After four months of dancing, participants were able to complete a 400-meter walk faster and increased their leisure physical activity level.
4 Mar 2016 at 9:57pm
Does a 'Western diet' increase risk of Alzheimer's disease?
New research provides insight into the role of the western diet in Alzheimer?s disease.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:48pm
Woodpecker drumming signals wimp or warrior
Instead of a distinctive song, woodpeckers bang on trees with their bills to create a sound called drumming. In a new study, researchers tested how woodpecker pairs perceived drumming to see how it influenced territorial interaction and coordination of defensive behavior.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:36pm
Marine protected areas intensify both cooperation and competition
Marine protected areas generate both extreme cooperation and extreme competition among commercial fishers. When these behaviors remain in balance, they can lead to better conservation of marine resources, a new study finds. However, if competition among fishers increases while cooperation declines, it could threaten the long-term survival of marine protected areas, their biodiversity and the communities that depend on them.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:04pm
Eating peanut in early years helps reduce risk of allergy even with later abs...
The early introduction of peanut to the diets of infants at high-risk of developing peanut allergy significantly reduces the risk of peanut allergy until 6 years of age, even if they stop eating peanut around the age of five, according to a new study.
4 Mar 2016 at 4:04pm

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Giant deep-sea worms may live to be 1000 years old or more
Escarpia laminata lives on the sea floor, where food is plentiful and predators are absent ? a perfect environment for longevity
21 Jul 2017 at 9:19am
Blood test detects Alzheimer?s plaques building up in brain
Sticky plaques start forming in the brain 15 years before Alzheimer?s disease develops. A simple blood test may identify those at risk years in advance
20 Jul 2017 at 7:30am
Tanzanian volcano blast could destroy ancient hominin footprints
If Ol Doinyo Lengai erupts, iconic prints at Laetoli and another set at Engare Sero are at risk
18 Jul 2017 at 12:33pm
Brexiteers must not risk UK?s nuclear future by leaving Euratom
If the UK leaves Europe?s nuclear regulator when it quits the EU, it risks disrupting nuclear fuel supplies and even cancer treatments, warns Alex Connor
12 Jul 2017 at 1:52pm
Centenarians May Be Healthier In Final Years Of Life Than Previously Thought
Those who live to reach the 100-year mark may be healthier in their final years of life than researchers previously thought, according to a new study.
23 Jul 2017 at 9:44pm
Alzheimer?s Disease Gene May Increase Risk Of Sleep Disorder-Related Cognitiv...
A certain gene associated with Alzheimer's disease may also increase risk of cognition problems in those with certain sleep conditions.
21 Jul 2017 at 2:39pm
Working More Than 55 Hours a Week Could Affect Heart Health
Working more than 55 hours a week may increase the risk of developing an irregular heartbeat, study finds.
20 Jul 2017 at 2:22pm
9 Ways To Prevent Dementia, From Getting More Exercise To Managing Depression
Managing lifestyle factors could greatly reduce the number of dementia cases worldwide.
20 Jul 2017 at 12:15am
Sugar Substitutes May Be Sabotaging Your Weight Loss Plans
Sugar substitutes may not be as healthy as you think, according to a new report.
19 Jul 2017 at 6:11pm
Woman, 59, Gave Birth To Healthy Baby Through IVF After Decades Trying Naturally
Despite health risks, 59-year-old Akosua Budu Amoako gave birth to healthy baby after in vitro fertilization.
19 Jul 2017 at 3:07pm
America's Most and Least Stressed Cities Ranked For 2017
WalletHub releases data on most stressful cities in the United States.
18 Jul 2017 at 7:45pm
Gaining Even A Little Weight Midlife Can Affect Your Health, Raise Risk Of Ch...
Packing on as little as 5 pounds in early adulthood may increase the risk of chronic disease, according to a Harvard study.
18 Jul 2017 at 7:31pm
Women With More Attractive Husbands May Have Heightened Risk Of Disordered Ea...
A new study suggests that women with attractive husbands may be more likely to suffer disordered eating habits.
17 Jul 2017 at 6:14pm

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School Safety Tips For Younger Kids
School is back in session, so take some time to go over these important safety tips with your children. This is just the beginning of the conversation, but it's a great place to get started.
21 Jul 2014 at 8:00am
Estrogen May Influence Women's Depression Risk
Early menstruation, more frequent periods seem to make sad times less likely, researchers suggest
21 Jul 2017 at 10:15am
Nine Risk Factors Boost Dementia Risk: Study
Reducing mid-life hearing loss might make the biggest difference
20 Jul 2017 at 10:15am
As Weight Creeps Up, So Does Risk of Heart Failure
But losing a few pounds might help decrease the damage, cardiologist suggests
19 Jul 2017 at 6:15pm
Early Menopause May Be Tied to Type 2 Diabetes
When periods stop before 40, risk is 4 times greater compared to late menopause, study suggests
19 Jul 2017 at 10:15am
FAQ: What To Know About Dangerous Vibrio Bacteria
Understanding the risks, symptoms and treatment for disease bacteria found in saltwater and raw fish can cause.
14 Jul 2017 at 2:40pm
'Observation' Best for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer
20-year study found little difference in death rates, more complications with surgery
13 Jul 2017 at 10:15am
Breast-Feeding May Lower Risk of MS, Study Says
Benefits reported for women who nursed 15 months or more
12 Jul 2017 at 6:15pm
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm

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In South Asian Social Castes, a Living Lab for Genetic Disease
Millenniums of marriages within well-defined subgroups in South Asia have created many populations with higher risks of recessive disease, according to new research.
17 Jul 2017 at 11:00am
Where Else Does the U.S. Have an Infrastructure Problem? Antarctica
The United States has had the most ambitious research program in Antarctica for 50 years. But our reporters journeyed there and found the infrastructure is aging and deteriorating, and the new price tags are high.
17 Jul 2017 at 5:00am
With diabetes rising at alarming rate, California puts money behind preventio...

California officials decided this week to dedicate $5 million to prevent people at high risk for diabetes from getting the disease, hoping to stem the huge numbers of Californians expected to be diagnosed in the coming years.

Currently 9% of Californians have diabetes, but a study last year found...


11 Jul 2017 at 9:05pm
How to keep skin looking young? We asked the experts

The beauty market is awash with anti-aging products, and the lists of ingredients in serums and creams that promise to slow down or reverse that process can be confounding.

Take a look at the fine print and you might encounter Vitamin C or green tea extract or alpha-hydroxy acids. Can anything...


1 Jul 2017 at 12:00pm
Half of Americans have diabetes or a high risk for it ? and many of them are ...
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a new report card on diabetes in America. It's everywhere.
18 Jul 2017 at 6:10pm
In the U.S., infant mortality gap costs the lives of about 4,000 black babies...

If black infants born in the United States had all of the health and medical benefits enjoyed by white infants, nearly 4,000 fewer of them would die each year, new research suggests.

That would amount to a nearly 60% decrease in the number of black infants that die each year. Instead, black babies...


3 Jul 2017 at 11:00am

NIH Press Releases



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NIH News Release
NIH News Release
News releases from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Affective neuroscience expert Dr. Richard Davidson to speak on meditation res...
20 Apr 2016 at 1:00pm
NCCIH presents ?Change Your Brain by Transforming Your Mind?.


NIH study finds factors that may influence influenza vaccine effectiveness
19 Apr 2016 at 8:30pm
Long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited.


Statement on Review of NIH Sterile Production Facilities
19 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Production suspended in two facilities.


NCI opens online platform to submit ideas about research for Cancer Moonshot
18 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Submissions will be considered by a panel of scientific experts and patient advocates.


Healthy diet may reduce high blood pressure risk after gestational diabetes, ...
18 Apr 2016 at 8:00pm
Women who have had gestational diabetes may indeed benefit from a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.


NIH launches research program to reduce health disparities in surgical outcomes
18 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
The initiative will involve collaborations among several NIH institutes and centers, AHRQ.


Islet transplantation restores blood sugar awareness and control in type 1 di...
18 Apr 2016 at 2:00pm
NIH-funded study lays groundwork for potential application submission to FDA for licensure of islet preparation.


Greenness around homes linked to lower mortality
15 Apr 2016 at 4:00pm
Researchers found the biggest differences in death rates from kidney disease, respiratory disease, and cancer.


NIH sequences genome of a fungus that causes life-threatening pneumonia
11 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
Pneumocystis was one of the first infections that led to the initial recognition of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.


New role identified for scars at the site of injured spinal cord
7 Apr 2016 at 7:00pm
NIH-funded mouse study suggests scar formation may help, not hinder, nerve regrowth.


NIH Announcements


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NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA)
Weekly Funding Opportunities and Policy Notices from the National Institutes of Health.

Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Conformanc...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:52am
Notice NOT-FD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Reminder: NHLBI FY2017 Small Business Topics of Special Interest (TOSI) for t...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:48am
Notice NOT-HL-16-479 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of Extension of the Expiration Date for PA-16-282 Developing New Clini...
12 Dec 2016 at 1:25am
Notice NOT-HS-17-005 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of an Informational Webinar for RFA-NS-17-017 "Frontotemporal Degenera...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:09am
Notice NOT-NS-17-010 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Pragmatic Clinical Trials Demonstr...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit UG3/UH3 phased cooperative agreement research applications to conduct efficient, large-scale pragmatic clinical trial Demonstration Projects within the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other co-morbid conditions in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. This program will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program. Awards made under this FOA will initially support a two-year milestone-driven planning phase (UG3), with possible transition to a pragmatic trial Demonstration Project implementation phase (UH3). UG3 projects that have met the scientific milestone and feasibility requirements may transition to the UH3 phase. The UG3/UH3 application must be submitted as a single application, following the instructions described in this FOA. The overall goal of this initiative, jointly supported by the NIH, DoD, and VA, is to develop the capacity to implement cost-effective large-scale clinical research in military and veteran health care delivery organizations focusing on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other comorbid conditions. The NIH, DoD, and VA expect to: establish a Coordinating Center that will provide national leadership and technical expertise for all aspects of health care system (HCS_- focused research including assistance to UG3/UH3 grant applicants. Primary outcomes of treatment interventions include assessing pain and pain reduction, ability to function in daily life, quality of life, and medication usage/reduction/discontinuation. Secondary outcomes focusing on assessing comorbid conditions or those co-occurring with high frequency in this population are also of interest under the FOA.
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Coordinating Center (U24)
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit applications for a Coordinating Center (CC) to provide national leadership for the NIH-DoD-VA Health Care Systems (HCS) Research Collaboratory program on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and comorbidities in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. For brevity, this initiative will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory. Coordinating Center applicants will need to: 1) develop, adapt, and adopt technical and policy guidelines and best practices for the effective conduct of research in partnership with health care systems focused on military personnel, veterans, and their families; 2) work collaboratively with and provide technical, design, and other support to Demonstration Project teams, to develop and implement a pragmatic trial protocol; and 3) disseminate widely Collaboratory-endorsed policies and best practices and lessons learned in the Demonstration Projects for implementing research within health care settings. The Coordinating Center will also serve as the central resource for the activities of the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program, including providing administrative support for a Steering Committee and its subcommittees.
Innovations for Healthy Living - Improving Population Health and Eliminating ...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes and in preventing disease and improving health in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Technologies for Improving Minority Health and Eliminating Health Disparities...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Novel Analytical Approaches for Metabolomics Data (R03)
12 Dec 2016 at 9:57am
Funding Opportunity RFA-RM-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this small research grant Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to foster collaboration between computational scientists, metabolomics experts, and biomedical researchers in developing, piloting, and/or validating novel bioinformatic approaches that address current analytical hurdles in metabolomics data. A goal of providing powerful approaches that will be useful to biomedical researchers, as well as bioinformaticians, is particularly encouraged. Projects are not intended to supplement ongoing metabolomics analyses, but to provide a tool for broader use by the biomedical research community. Projects are expected to use existing, publicly available metabolomics data and complement the efforts and resources of the Common Fund Metabolomics Program.
Utilizing Health Information Technology to Scale and Spread Successful Practi...
12 Dec 2016 at 10:39am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-077 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites R18 grant applications for research that demonstrates how health information technology (IT) can improve patient-centered health outcomes and quality of care in primary care and other ambulatory settings through the scale and spread of successful, health IT-enabled practice models that use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to achieve these objectives.
Administrative Supplement for Research on Sex/Gender Influences (Admin Supp)
12 Dec 2016 at 1:27am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-078 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) announces the availability of administrative supplements to support research highlighting the impact of sex/gender influences and/or sex and gender factors in human health and illness, including basic, preclinical, clinical and behavioral studies. Of special interest are studies relevant to understanding the significance of biological sex on cells and tissue explants; comparative studies of male and female tissues, organ systems and physiological systems; sex-based comparisons of pathophysiology, biomarkers, gene expression, clinical presentation and prevention and treatment of diseases. The most robust experimental designs include consideration of both sex and gender; therefore, applications proposing to investigate the influence of both sex and gender factors are highly encouraged. The proposed research must address at least one objective from Goals 1 through 3 of the NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research.
Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 10:19am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-074 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $50,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $600,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 11:23am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-075 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-funded investigators to purchase or upgrade scientific instruments necessary to carry out animal experiments in all areas of biomedical research supported by the NIH. Applicants may request clusters of commercially available instruments configured as specialized integrated systems or as series of instruments to support a thematic workflow in a well-defined area of research using animals or related materials. Priority will be given to specialized clusters of instruments and to uniquely configured systems to support innovative and potentially transformative investigations. Requests for a single instrument will be considered only if the instrument is to be placed in a barrier facility. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) supports requests for state-of-the art commercially available technologies needed for NIH-funded research using any vertebrate and invertebrate animal species. It is expected that the use of the awarded instruments will enhance the scientific rigor of animal research and improve the reproducibility of experimental outcomes. One item of the requested instrumentation must cost at least $50,000. No instrument in a cluster can cost less than $20,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $750,000.
High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 12:15pm
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-076 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $600,001. The maximum award is $2,000,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffraction systems, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and confocal microscopes, cell-sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Increasing the Use of Medications for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders ...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:26am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-079 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages health services research designed to increase the public health impact of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for the treatment of alcohol use disorder. Significant progress is needed in developing generalizable, scalable, cost-effective strategies to move these evidence-based interventions into the mainstream of alcohol use disorder treatment, in both general medical and specialty care settings. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) seeks applications to conduct hypothesis-driven research to identify effective methods for increasing the utilization of currently-available medications, by addressing their acceptability (to prescribers and patients), perceived effectiveness, affordability, and feasibility of use within existing care delivery systems.