Aging, Longevity and Health in the News


Nature: Current issue

Science journals end open-access trial with Gates Foundation
by Richard Van Noorden
13 Jul 2018 at 12:00am
Evolution of a central neural circuit underlies Drosophila mate preferences
by Laura F. SeeholzerMax SeppoDavid L. SternVanessa Ruta
11 Jul 2018 at 12:00am
Foreign-researcher figures stress need for immigration reform before Brexit
by Elizabeth Gibney
10 Jul 2018 at 12:00am
Prediction of acute myeloid leukaemia risk in healthy individuals
by Sagi AbelsonGrace CollordStanley W. K. NgOmer WeissbrodNetta Mendelson CohenElisabeth NiemeyerNoam BardaPhilip C. ZuzarteLawrence HeislerYogi SundaravadanamRobert LubenShabina HayatTing Ting WangZhen ZhaoIulia CirlanTrevor J. PughDavid SoaveKaren NgCalli LatimerClaire HardyKeiran RaineDavid JonesDiana HoultAbigail BrittenJohn D. McPhersonMattias JohanssonFaridah MbabaaliJenna EaglesJessica K. MillerDanielle PasternackLee TimmsPaul KrzyzanowskiPhilip AwadallaRui CostaEran SegalScott V. BratmanPhilip BeerSam BehjatiInigo MartincorenaJean C. Y. WangKristian M. BowlesJ. Ramón QuirósAnna KarakatsaniCarlo La VecchiaAntonia TrichopoulouElena Salamanca-FernándezJosé M. HuertaAurelio BarricarteRuth C. TravisRosario TuminoGiovanna MasalaHeiner BoeingSalvatore PanicoRudolf KaaksAlwin KrämerSabina SieriElio RiboliPaolo VineisMatthieu FollJames McKaySilvia PolidoroNúria SalaKay-Tee KhawRoel VermeulenPeter J. CampbellElli PapaemmanuilMark D. MindenAmos TanayRan D. BalicerNicholas J. WarehamMoritz GerstungJohn E. DickPaul BrennanGeorge S. VassiliouLiran I. Shlush
9 Jul 2018 at 12:00am
A two-million-year-long hydroclimatic context for hominin evolution in southe...
by Thibaut CaleyThomas ExtierJames A. CollinsEnno SchefußLydie DupontBruno MalaizéLinda RossignolAntoine SouronErin L. McClymontFrancisco J. Jimenez-EspejoCarmen García-ComasFrédérique EynaudPhilippe MartinezDidier M. RocheStephan J. JorryKarine CharlierMélanie WaryPierre-Yves GourvesIsabelle BillyJacques Giraudeau
9 Jul 2018 at 12:00am

Scientific American: Current issue


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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Single-cell mutagenic responses and cell death revealed in real time [Genetics]
by Bennett Van Houten, Neil M. Kad
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
When musing about evolution, the physician and scientific essayist Lewis Thomas wrote, ?The capacity to blunder slightly is the real marvel of DNA. Without this special attribute, we would still be anaerobic bacteria and there would be no music? (1). Understanding how DNA mutations arise in cells, e...
Psychological health and socioeconomic status among non-Hispanic whites [Soci...
by Andrew J. Cherlin
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
Much attention has been paid of late to drug abuse and mortality among less-educated whites. This group, often referred to as the ?white working class,? is typically defined as non-Hispanic whites who do not have Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science college degrees (1). Mortality rates have risen...
PIP30/FAM192A is a novel regulator of the nuclear proteasome activator PA28{g...
by Beata Jonik–Nowak, Thomas Menneteau, Didier Fesquet, Veronique Baldin, Catherine Bonne–Andrea, Francisca Mechali, Bertrand Fabre, Prisca Boisguerin, Sylvain de Rossi, Corinne Henriquet, Martine Pugniere, Manuelle Ducoux–Petit, Odile Burlet–Schiltz, Angus I. Lamond, Philippe Fort, Severine Boulon, Marie–Pierre Bousquet, Olivier Coux
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
PA28? is a nuclear activator of the 20S proteasome involved in the regulation of several essential cellular processes, such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, nuclear dynamics, and cellular stress response. Unlike the 19S regulator of the proteasome, which specifically recognizes ubiquitylated protei...
Real-time dynamics of mutagenesis reveal the chronology of DNA repair and dam...
by Stephan Uphoff
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
Evolutionary processes are driven by diverse molecular mechanisms that act in the creation and prevention of mutations. It remains unclear how these mechanisms are regulated because limitations of existing mutation assays have precluded measuring how mutation rates vary over time in single cells. To...
Evolutionary genomic dynamics of Peruvians before, during, and after the Inca...
by Daniel N. Harris, Wei Song, Amol C. Shetty, Kelly S. Levano, Omar Caceres, Carlos Padilla, Victor Borda, David Tarazona, Omar Truȷillo, Cesar Sanchez, Michael D. Kessler, Marco Galarza, Silvia Capristano, Harrison Monteȷo, Pedro O. Flores–Villanueva, Eduardo Tarazona–Santos, Timothy D. O’Connor, Heinner Guio
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
Native Americans from the Amazon, Andes, and coastal geographic regions of South America have a rich cultural heritage but are genetically understudied, therefore leading to gaps in our knowledge of their genomic architecture and demographic history. In this study, we sequence 150 genomes to high co...
Autoantibodies reactive to adrenocorticotropic hormone can alter cortisol sec...
by Henning Varoy, Csaba Adori, Romain Legrand, Nicolas Lucas, Jonathan Breton, Caroline Cottard, Jean–Claude do Rego, Celine Duparc, Estelle Louiset, Herve Lefebvre, Pierre Dechelotte, Elin Western, Stein Andersson, Tomas Hokfelt, Serguei O. Fetissov
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
Violent aggression in humans may involve a modified response to stress, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that naturally present autoantibodies reactive to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) exhibit distinct epitope-binding profiles to ACTH peptide in subjects with ...
Piano training enhances the neural processing of pitch and improves speech pe...
by Yun Nan, Li Liu, Eveline Geiser, Hua Shu, Chen Chen Gong, Qi Dong, John D. E. Gabrieli, Robert Desimone
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
Musical training confers advantages in speech-sound processing, which could play an important role in early childhood education. To understand the mechanisms of this effect, we used event-related potential and behavioral measures in a longitudinal design. Seventy-four Mandarin-speaking children aged...
Amyloid clearance defect in ApoE4 astrocytes is reversed by epigenetic correc...
by Hari Prasad, Rajini Rao
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
Endosomes have emerged as a central hub and pathogenic driver of Alzheimer?s disease (AD). The earliest brain cytopathology in neurodegeneration, occurring decades before amyloid plaques and cognitive decline, is an expansion in the size and number of endosomal compartments. The strongest genetic ri...
Symmetric shear banding and swarming vortices in bacterial superfluids [Appli...
by Shuo Guo, Devranjan Samanta, Yi Peng, Xinliang Xu, Xiang Cheng
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
Bacterial suspensions?a premier example of active fluids?show an unusual response to shear stresses. Instead of increasing the viscosity of the suspending fluid, the emergent collective motions of swimming bacteria can turn a suspension into a superfluid with zero apparent viscosity. Although the ex...
Fast charging of lithium-ion batteries at all temperatures [Engineering]
by Xiao-Guang Yang, Guangsheng Zhang, Shanhai Ge, Chao-Yang Wang
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
Fast charging is a key enabler of mainstream adoption of electric vehicles (EVs). None of today?s EVs can withstand fast charging in cold or even cool temperatures due to the risk of lithium plating. Efforts to enable fast charging are hampered by the trade-off nature of a lithium-ion battery: Impro...
Changes in brain architecture are consistent with altered fear processing in ...
by Irene Brusini, Miguel Carneiro, Chunliang Wang, Carl–Johan Rubin, Henrik Ring, Sandra Afonso, Jose A. Blanco–Aguiar, Nuno Ferrand, Nima Rafati, Rafael Villafuerte, Orȷan Smedby, Peter Damberg, Finn Hallbook, Mats Fredrikson, Leif Andersson
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
The most characteristic feature of domestic animals is their change in behavior associated with selection for tameness. Here we show, using high-resolution brain magnetic resonance imaging in wild and domestic rabbits, that domestication reduced amygdala volume and enlarged medial prefrontal cortex ...
Costs, needs, and integration efforts shape helping behavior toward refugees ...
by Robert Bohm, Maik M. P. Theelen, Hannes Rusch, Paul A. M. Van Lange
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
Recent political instabilities and conflicts around the world have drastically increased the number of people seeking refuge. The challenges associated with the large number of arriving refugees have revealed a deep divide among the citizens of host countries: one group welcomes refugees, whereas an...
Declining mental health among disadvantaged Americans [Social Sciences]
by Noreen Goldman, Dana A. Glei, Maxine Weinstein
10 Jul 2018 at 12:36pm
Although there is little dispute about the impact of the US opioid epidemic on recent mortality, there is less consensus about whether trends reflect increasing despair among American adults. The issue is complicated by the absence of established scales or definitions of despair as well as a paucity...

Science

[Research Articles] TORC1 inhibition enhances immune function and reduces inf...
by Mannick, J. B., Morris, M., Hockey, H.-U. P., Roma, G., Beibel, M., Kulmatycki, K., Watkins, M., Shavlakadze, T., Zhou, W., Quinn, D., Glass, D. J., Klickstein, L. B.
11 Jul 2018 at 1:51pm

Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase extends life span and ameliorates aging-related pathologies including declining immune function in model organisms. The objective of this phase 2a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was to determine whether low-dose m...


[Research Articles] Modeling of patient virus titers suggests that availabili...
by Major, M., Gutfraind, A., Shekhtman, L., Cui, Q., Kachko, A., Cotler, S. J., Hajarizadeh, B., Sacks-Davis, R., Page, K., Boodram, B., Dahari, H.
11 Jul 2018 at 1:51pm

The major route of hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission in the United States is injection drug use. We hypothesized that if an HCV vaccine were available, vaccination could affect HCV transmission among people who inject drugs by reducing HCV titers after viral exposure without necessarily achieving...


[Research Articles] TORC1 inhibition enhances immune function and reduces inf...
by Mannick, J. B., Morris, M., Hockey, H.-U. P., Roma, G., Beibel, M., Kulmatycki, K., Watkins, M., Shavlakadze, T., Zhou, W., Quinn, D., Glass, D. J., Klickstein, L. B.
11 Jul 2018 at 1:51pm

Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase extends life span and ameliorates aging-related pathologies including declining immune function in model organisms. The objective of this phase 2a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was to determine whether low-dose m...


[Research Articles] Modeling of patient virus titers suggests that availabili...
by Major, M., Gutfraind, A., Shekhtman, L., Cui, Q., Kachko, A., Cotler, S. J., Hajarizadeh, B., Sacks-Davis, R., Page, K., Boodram, B., Dahari, H.
11 Jul 2018 at 1:51pm

The major route of hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission in the United States is injection drug use. We hypothesized that if an HCV vaccine were available, vaccination could affect HCV transmission among people who inject drugs by reducing HCV titers after viral exposure without necessarily achieving...


[Research Articles] The human naive B cell repertoire contains distinct subcl...
by Havenar-Daughton, C., Sarkar, A., Kulp, D. W., Toy, L., Hu, X., Deresa, I., Kalyuzhniy, O., Kaushik, K., Upadhyay, A. A., Menis, S., Landais, E., Cao, L., Diedrich, J. K., Kumar, S., Schiffner, T., Reiss, S. M., Seumois, G., Yates, J. R., Paulson, J. C., Bosinger, S. E., Wilson, I. A., Schief, W. R., Crotty, S.
4 Jul 2018 at 1:49pm

Traditional vaccine development to prevent some of the worst current pandemic diseases has been unsuccessful so far. Germline-targeting immunogens have potential to prime protective antibodies (Abs) via more targeted immune responses. Success of germline-targeting vaccines in humans will depend on t...


[Research Articles] BCL3 expression promotes resistance to alkylating chemoth...
by Wu, L., Bernal, G. M., Cahill, K. E., Pytel, P., Fitzpatrick, C. A., Mashek, H., Weichselbaum, R. R., Yamini, B.
4 Jul 2018 at 1:49pm

The response of patients with gliomas to alkylating chemotherapy is heterogeneous. However, there are currently no universally accepted predictors of patient response to these agents. We identify the nuclear factor B (NF-B) co-regulator B cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (BCL-3) as an independent predictor of re...


[Research Articles] Reversal of endothelial dysfunction reduces white matter ...
by Rajani, R. M., Quick, S., Ruigrok, S. R., Graham, D., Harris, S. E., Verhaaren, B. F. J., Fornage, M., Seshadri, S., Atanur, S. S., Dominiczak, A. F., Smith, C., Wardlaw, J. M., Williams, A.
4 Jul 2018 at 1:49pm

Dementia is a major social and economic problem for our aging population. One of the most common of dementia in the elderly is cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Magnetic resonance scans of SVD patients typically show white matter abnormalities, but we do not understand the mechanistic pathologica...


[Editors' Choice] Faulty fat cells linked to weight gain
by Page, K. A.
27 Jun 2018 at 1:53pm

Altered fat cell lipolysis predicts long-term weight gain and risk of type 2 diabetes.


[Research Articles] Opiates increase the number of hypocretin-producing cells...
by Thannickal, T. C., John, J., Shan, L., Swaab, D. F., Wu, M.-F., Ramanathan, L., McGregor, R., Chew, K.-T., Cornford, M., Yamanaka, A., Inutsuka, A., Fronczek, R., Lammers, G. J., Worley, P. F., Siegel, J. M.
27 Jun 2018 at 1:53pm

The changes in brain function that perpetuate opiate addiction are unclear. In our studies of human narcolepsy, a disease caused by loss of immunohistochemically detected hypocretin (orexin) neurons, we encountered a control brain (from an apparently neurologically normal individual) with 50% more h...


[Research Articles] Preclinical assessment of antiviral combination therapy i...
by Winer, B. Y., Shirvani-Dastgerdi, E., Bram, Y., Sellau, J., Low, B. E., Johnson, H., Huang, T., Hrebikova, G., Heller, B., Sharon, Y., Giersch, K., Gerges, S., Seneca, K., Pais, M.-A., Frankel, A. S., Chiriboga, L., Cullen, J., Nahass, R. G., Lutgehetmann, M., Toettcher, J. E., Wiles, M. V., Schwartz, R. E., Ploss, A.
27 Jun 2018 at 1:53pm

Chronic delta hepatitis, caused by hepatitis delta virus (HDV), is the most severe form of viral hepatitis, affecting at least 20 million hepatitis B virus (HBV)–infected patients worldwide. HDV/HBV co- or superinfections are major drivers for hepatocarcinogenesis. Antiviral treatments exist o...


High thermal conductivity in cubic boron arsenide crystals
by Li, S., Zheng, Q., Lv, Y., Liu, X., Wang, X., Huang, P. Y., Cahill, D. G., Lv, B.
5 Jul 2018 at 1:45pm

The high density of heat generated in power electronics and optoelectronic devices is a critical bottleneck in their application. New, high thermally-conducting materials are needed to effectively dissipate heat and thereby enable enhanced performance of power controls, solid-state lighting, communi...


A dust-enshrouded tidal disruption event with a resolved radio jet in a galax...
by Mattila, S., Perez-Torres, M., Efstathiou, A., Mimica, P., Fraser, M., Kankare, E., Alberdi, A., Aloy, M. A., Heikkilä, T., Jonker, P. G., Lundqvist, P., Marti-Vidal, I., Meikle, W. P. S., Romero-Canizales, C., Smartt, S. J., Tsygankov, S., Varenius, E., Alonso-Herrero, A., Bondi, M., Fransson, C., Herrero-Illana, R., Kangas, T., Kotak, R., Ramirez-Olivencia, N., Väisänen, P., Beswick, R. J., Clements, D. L., Greimel, R., Harmanen, J., Kotilainen, J., Nandra, K., Reynolds, T., Ryder, S., Walton, N. A., Wiik, K., Östlin, G.
14 Jun 2018 at 1:45pm

Tidal disruption events (TDEs) are transient flares produced when a star is ripped apart by the gravitational field of a supermassive black hole (SMBH). We have observed a transient source in the western nucleus of the merging galaxy pair Arp 299 that radiated >1.5 x 1052 erg in the infrared and ...


Friction at the bed does not control fast glacier flow
by Stearns, L. A., van der Veen, C. J.
7 Jun 2018 at 1:44pm

The largest uncertainty in ice sheet models used to predict future sea-level rise originates from our limited understanding of processes at the ice-bed interface. Near glacier termini, where basal sliding controls ice flow, most predictive ice sheet models use a parameterization of sliding that has...


Single-proton spin detection by diamond magnetometry
by Loretz, M., Rosskopf, T., Boss, J. M., Pezzagna, S., Meijer, J., Degen, C. L.
8 Jan 2015 at 2:55pm

Extending magnetic resonance imaging to the atomic scale has been a long-standing aspiration, driven by the prospect of directly mapping atomic positions in molecules with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We report detection of individual, isolated proton spins by a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center...


A Single Molecular Spin Valve
by Schon, Emberly, Kirczenow
18 Apr 2002 at 2:53pm

The charge transport through a single benzene-1,4-dithiolate molecule embedded in an inert matrix of insulating alkanethiol molecules and sandwiched between ferromagnetic electrodes is studied as a function of magnetic field. Electronic transport through the device structure shows a pronounced spin ...



British Medical Journal

Maura Lynch: fistula fighter and nun
by Joanna Lyall
23 Mar 2018 at 8:21am
When Maura Lynch entered the order of the Medical Missionaries of Mary two days before her 18th birthday, she was hoping to spend her life serving poor populations in Africa. By the time of her death...
Dyslipidaemia and cardiovascular risk
by Aidan Ryan, Simon Heath, Paul Cook
23 Mar 2018 at 7:06am
What you need to knowFull lipid profile (total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, and triglyceride) is necessary for the diagnosis of hypercholesterolaemiaAsk about a...

New England Journal of Medicine

Biomarkers and Aging in the News

Stopping type 1 diabetes from birth
Experts believe they may have found a way to prevent the condition from developing in at risk babies.
10 Jul 2018 at 7:49pm
Immediate stop to NHS mesh operations
Mesh must not be routinely used to treat women with stress urinary incontinence, NHS England told.
9 Jul 2018 at 7:08pm
The watch that could help manage severe autism
By measuring stress and anxiety levels, this wearable device could help people communicate.
9 Jul 2018 at 7:07pm
What would you write to your younger self?
How often do you think how different your life would be if you knew, when you were a teenager, what you know now?
12 Jul 2018 at 4:38am
Blood pressure linked to lesions, signs of Alzheimer's in autopsied brains
Older people with higher-than-average blood pressure have more markers of brain disease than their average-pressure peers, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Neurology. In particular, the researchers saw increased signs of brain infarcts, or areas of dead tissue caused by a block in the blood supply to the brain, when looking at postmortem tissue under a microscope.
12 Jul 2018 at 5:58am

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Breast-Feeding or Formula? For Americans, It?s Complicated
A brief history of the debate in the U.S., from the rise of formula to the Trump administration opposing an international resolution encouraging breast-feeding.
14 Jul 2018 at 5:00am
Take a Walk in the Woods. Doctor's Orders.
?Forest bathing,? or immersing yourself in nature, is being embraced by doctors and others as a way to combat stress and improve health.
15 Jul 2018 at 11:34am
Multivitamins May Not Provide Heart Benefits
An analysis found no ties between multivitamins and the risk for cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease or stroke incidence or mortality.
12 Jul 2018 at 5:27pm
A Survival Guide for the Fourth Trimester
Practical suggestions for women dealing with the surprising things that happen to their bodies in the first months after childbirth.
12 Jul 2018 at 1:21am
45-Hour Workweek Increases Diabetes Risk in Women
Women ? but not men ? who worked long hours were at increased risk of diabetes.
10 Jul 2018 at 2:57pm
Melanoma cases rising; young women at greatest risk
Study says that could be because they are more likely to use tanning beds than men.        
2 Apr 2012 at 10:15am
Long use of any hormones raises women's breast cancer risk
A new study tracked about 60,000 nurses and found that use of any kind of hormones for 10 years or more slightly raised the chances.        
1 Apr 2012 at 1:28pm
Radiation may up breast cancer risk in some women
Mammograms might raise the chances of developing cancer in young women whose genes put them at higher risk, a study suggests.        
6 Sep 2012 at 6:30pm
U.N.: Chemicals damaging health and environment
The report by the U.N. Environment Program warned that the increasing production of chemicals is increasing health costs.        
6 Sep 2012 at 11:25am
Study: Ginkgo doesn't prevent Alzheimer's disease
Taking ginkgo biloba didn't prevent Alzheimer's disease in older adults, according to the biggest prevention study in Europe.       
5 Sep 2012 at 10:34pm
University pulls Kinsey Institute app over privacy concerns
The Kinsey Institute released a new mobile app that allows users to report on sexual behavior and experiences.       
5 Sep 2012 at 9:43pm
War might be making young bodies old
A VA study finds that veterans in their 20s and 30s show signs of premature aging.       
5 Sep 2012 at 5:56pm
Express Scripts to limit opioid prescriptions
Move by largest pharmacy benefits manager to lower addiction risks of painkillers draws objections from AMA
16 Aug 2017 at 7:15pm
Why is knee arthritis twice as common as it used to be?
It's estimated that the lifetime risk of developing the condition is 46 percent
15 Aug 2017 at 3:51pm
Why are cases of knee osteoarthritis on the rise?
A new study found osteoarthritis of the knee is more than twice as common as it was just a few generations ago. It's estimated the lifetime risk of developing this condition is 46 percent, but it is possible to protect your knees. Dr. Jordan Metzl, a sports medicine physician at New York's Hospital for Special Surgery, joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss possible reasons for the increase and what you can do to reduce the symptoms.
15 Aug 2017 at 1:13pm
An alcoholic drink per day can lower risk of cardiovascular disease, study says
Having a glass of wine or beer with dinner tonight may be good for you, according to a new study. Researchers found women who had up to one drink a day and men who averaged up to two a day had a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. Dr. Jon LaPook explains.
14 Aug 2017 at 11:45pm
Morning Rounds: Colon cancer deaths, stroke rates among women
Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss a surprising and concerning rise in colon cancer death rates among younger Americans, a new study that shows stroke rates are going down for men but not women and a new development in the on-going battle with antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
12 Aug 2017 at 12:48pm
How to protect your eyes while viewing the solar eclipse
Millions of Americans will look at the sky on Aug. 21 for the first coast-to-coast total eclipse of the sun in 99 years. But if you want to catch a glimpse, you should take precautions to avoid damaging your vision. Ophthamologist Dr. Christopher Starr joins "CBS This Morning" with more on how to protect your eyes.
11 Aug 2017 at 2:39pm

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Breast-Feeding or Formula? For Americans, It?s Complicated
A brief history of the debate in the U.S., from the rise of formula to the Trump administration opposing an international resolution encouraging breast-feeding.
14 Jul 2018 at 5:00am
Take a Walk in the Woods. Doctor's Orders.
?Forest bathing,? or immersing yourself in nature, is being embraced by doctors and others as a way to combat stress and improve health.
15 Jul 2018 at 11:34am
Multivitamins May Not Provide Heart Benefits
An analysis found no ties between multivitamins and the risk for cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease or stroke incidence or mortality.
12 Jul 2018 at 5:27pm
A Survival Guide for the Fourth Trimester
Practical suggestions for women dealing with the surprising things that happen to their bodies in the first months after childbirth.
12 Jul 2018 at 1:21am
45-Hour Workweek Increases Diabetes Risk in Women
Women ? but not men ? who worked long hours were at increased risk of diabetes.
10 Jul 2018 at 2:57pm
Late inception of a resiliently oxygenated upper ocean

Rising oceanic and atmospheric oxygen levels through time have been crucial to enhanced habitability of surface Earth environments. Few redox proxies can track secular variations in dissolved oxygen concentrations around threshold levels for metazoan survival in the upper ocean. We present an extensive compilation of iodine-to-calcium ratios (I/Ca) in marine carbonates. Our record supports a major rise in the partial pressure of oxygen in the atmosphere at ~400 million years (Ma) ago and reveals...


12 Jul 2018 at 1:39pm
Sensitivity to "sunk costs" in mice, rats, and humans

Sunk costs are irrecoverable investments that should not influence decisions, because decisions should be made on the basis of expected future consequences. Both human and nonhuman animals can show sensitivity to sunk costs, but reports from across species are inconsistent. In a temporal context, a sensitivity to sunk costs arises when an individual resists ending an activity, even if it seems unproductive, because of the time already invested. In two parallel foraging tasks that we designed, we...


12 Jul 2018 at 1:39pm
Comment on "Designing river flows to improve food security futures in the Low...

The designer flow regime proposed by Sabo et al. (Research Articles, 8 December 2017, p. 1270) to support fisheries in the Lower Mekong Basin fails to account for important ecological, political, and economic dimensions. In doing so, they indicate that dam impacts can be easily mitigated. Such an action would serve to increase risks to food and livelihood futures in the basin.


12 Jul 2018 at 1:39pm
Is Depression During Pregnancy on the Rise?
Compared with their mothers' generation, young women who became pregnant between 2012 and 2016 were at greater risk of having "high" scores when they were screened for depression, British researchers report.
13 Jul 2018 at 2:15pm
1 in 9 U.S. Adults Over 45 Reports Memory Issues
One in nine Americans aged 45 and older say they are having thinking problems, like confusion and memory loss, which the CDC says are not a normal part of aging.
13 Jul 2018 at 2:15pm
Heart Disease in Dogs May be Tied to Certain Foods
Large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers have a genetic risk for canine DCM, a disease of the heart muscle that often leads to congestive heart failure.
13 Jul 2018 at 11:20am
Can You Eat Your Way to Better Asthma Control?
Diets rich in fruits and vegetables and with less processed food were tied to a 30 percent lower risk of developing asthma symptoms for men, and a 20 percent lower risk for women, researchers have found.
13 Jul 2018 at 10:15am
Study: High Blood Pressure Threatens Aging Brain
Older people with high systolic blood pressure readings (the top number) had higher risks of having blood vessel blockages in the brain and tangles linked to Alzheimer's disease, researchers found in a study that tracked more than 1,300 people until they died.
11 Jul 2018 at 6:15pm
Feel Younger Than Your Years? Your Brain Shows It
If you feel younger than your years, the structure of your brain is different, a small new study finds.
11 Jul 2018 at 2:15pm
Insurance Gaps Costly With Type 1 Diabetes
Gaps in insurance coverage among people who have type 1 diabetes are more common than thought, putting them at greater risk for health emergencies.
11 Jul 2018 at 10:15am
'So Much Guilt' After Daughter Breaks Leg on Slide
A study found children under the age of 3 particularly at risk of broken bones from playground slides. They were 12 times more likely than older kids to be identified as riding on a lap at the time of their injury.
10 Jul 2018 at 6:01pm
PTSD May Put 9/11 First Responders' Hearts at Risk
About 20 percent of men and 26 percent of women who responded when the twin towers were attacked on Sept. 11, 2001 developed PTSD, which is at least twice the rate expected in the general population, the researchers said.
10 Jul 2018 at 2:15pm
More Social Media Time Raises Cyberbullying Risk
12,000 teens in Germany, Poland and Romania who used social network sites for more than two hours a day were at increased risk for cyberbullying, a new study has found.
10 Jul 2018 at 10:15am
More Evidence That Supplements Won't Help Your Heart
The Council for Responsible Nutrition, a trade association representing supplement makers, stressed that the products are meant as nutritional aids only, not as a means of preventing or treating illness.
10 Jul 2018 at 10:15am
Banned from Soap, Is Triclosan in Your Toothpaste?
Triclosan, an antibacterial and antimicrobial chemical, has been used in personal care products and as a pesticide for decades. Scientists in recent years have stepped up their research into its potential health risks. The findings have been mixed.
6 Jul 2018 at 11:00am
Dopamine levels in our brains affect the risks we?re happy to take
The first brain-scanning study to track activity in the brain's decision-making centres during gambling shows fluctuations in dopamine levels affect risk-taking
13 Jul 2018 at 8:03am
High blood pressure in older people linked to Alzheimer?s disease
For the first time, high blood pressure later in life has been linked to Alzheimer?s disease, a finding that might help us better understand the condition
11 Jul 2018 at 5:00pm
Eight cups of coffee a day make you live longer? Don?t bet on it
Drinking coffee has once more been linked to a lower risk of early death but there are good reasons this could turn out to be froth, says Naveed Sattar
5 Jul 2018 at 10:29am
Novichok poisoning: How could it happen again in Salisbury?
Health officials have said the risk to the public is low after a couple in Wiltshire have been exposed to the nerve agent Novichok
5 Jul 2018 at 8:38am
Smoke from moorland wildfires may hold toxic blast from the past
The UK?s largest wildfire for decades is almost under control, but peat burning below the ground risks spewing historical pollution back into the sky
4 Jul 2018 at 9:00am
New form of gold is much golder than normal gold
Gold never loses its lustre because it is so chemically unreactive, and now microscopic gold crystals have been made that are even less reactive
29 Jun 2018 at 7:06am
How old could humans get? We probably haven?t hit the limit yet
The idea that we have reached the maximum possible human lifespan is highly divisive. New evidence adds fuel to a fiery debate, says Tom Kirkwood
28 Jun 2018 at 3:00pm

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School Safety Tips For Younger Kids
School is back in session, so take some time to go over these important safety tips with your children. This is just the beginning of the conversation, but it's a great place to get started.
21 Jul 2014 at 8:00am
Is Depression During Pregnancy on the Rise?
Compared with their mothers' generation, young women who became pregnant between 2012 and 2016 were at greater risk of having "high" scores when they were screened for depression, British researchers report.
13 Jul 2018 at 2:15pm
1 in 9 U.S. Adults Over 45 Reports Memory Issues
One in nine Americans aged 45 and older say they are having thinking problems, like confusion and memory loss, which the CDC says are not a normal part of aging.
13 Jul 2018 at 2:15pm
Heart Disease in Dogs May be Tied to Certain Foods
Large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers have a genetic risk for canine DCM, a disease of the heart muscle that often leads to congestive heart failure.
13 Jul 2018 at 11:20am
Can You Eat Your Way to Better Asthma Control?
Diets rich in fruits and vegetables and with less processed food were tied to a 30 percent lower risk of developing asthma symptoms for men, and a 20 percent lower risk for women, researchers have found.
13 Jul 2018 at 10:15am
Study: High Blood Pressure Threatens Aging Brain
Older people with high systolic blood pressure readings (the top number) had higher risks of having blood vessel blockages in the brain and tangles linked to Alzheimer's disease, researchers found in a study that tracked more than 1,300 people until they died.
11 Jul 2018 at 6:15pm
Feel Younger Than Your Years? Your Brain Shows It
If you feel younger than your years, the structure of your brain is different, a small new study finds.
11 Jul 2018 at 2:15pm
Insurance Gaps Costly With Type 1 Diabetes
Gaps in insurance coverage among people who have type 1 diabetes are more common than thought, putting them at greater risk for health emergencies.
11 Jul 2018 at 10:15am
'So Much Guilt' After Daughter Breaks Leg on Slide
A study found children under the age of 3 particularly at risk of broken bones from playground slides. They were 12 times more likely than older kids to be identified as riding on a lap at the time of their injury.
10 Jul 2018 at 6:01pm
PTSD May Put 9/11 First Responders' Hearts at Risk
About 20 percent of men and 26 percent of women who responded when the twin towers were attacked on Sept. 11, 2001 developed PTSD, which is at least twice the rate expected in the general population, the researchers said.
10 Jul 2018 at 2:15pm
More Social Media Time Raises Cyberbullying Risk
12,000 teens in Germany, Poland and Romania who used social network sites for more than two hours a day were at increased risk for cyberbullying, a new study has found.
10 Jul 2018 at 10:15am
More Evidence That Supplements Won't Help Your Heart
The Council for Responsible Nutrition, a trade association representing supplement makers, stressed that the products are meant as nutritional aids only, not as a means of preventing or treating illness.
10 Jul 2018 at 10:15am
Banned from Soap, Is Triclosan in Your Toothpaste?
Triclosan, an antibacterial and antimicrobial chemical, has been used in personal care products and as a pesticide for decades. Scientists in recent years have stepped up their research into its potential health risks. The findings have been mixed.
6 Jul 2018 at 11:00am

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I tried a 100-degree Quartz Massage ? and loved it

Most Angelenos are familiar with the stress-melting effect of lounging on warm sand. Now they can build on that feeling with an unusual new massage treatment at Corona?s historic Glen Ivy Hot Springs spa, best known for its mud and mineral baths.

The 158-year-old spa recently introduced Quartz...


29 Jun 2018 at 10:00am
What health risks will the Thai soccer players face now that they've been res...

The worst is certainly over for the Thai boys who have been rescued from a flooded cave after being trapped there with their soccer coach for more than two weeks. But even though they?re out of immediate danger, it may be some time before they?ve recovered from the physical and mental consequences...


9 Jul 2018 at 8:00pm
To reduce your risk of obesity, it helps to have a mom who follows five healt...

Mothers lead the way for their children. And new research finds that the paths that moms walk (or the couches they sit and smoke on) make a powerful difference in their children?s propensity to become obese.

A study that tracked close to 17,000 female nurses and their 24,289 kids has found that...


5 Jul 2018 at 7:45pm
Can humans reach even older age? We haven't maxed out yet, some scientists say

On the day that one becomes an octogenarian, nature bestows a mathematical birthday gift: a gradual reprieve from the relentlessly increasing likelihood that he or she will die in the coming year.

That gift may come as small comfort against the growing creakiness of joints and the still-mounting...


28 Jun 2018 at 6:45pm

NIH Press Releases


NIH News Release
NIH News Release
News releases from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Affective neuroscience expert Dr. Richard Davidson to speak on meditation res...
20 Apr 2016 at 1:00pm
NCCIH presents ?Change Your Brain by Transforming Your Mind?.


NIH study finds factors that may influence influenza vaccine effectiveness
19 Apr 2016 at 8:30pm
Long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited.


Statement on Review of NIH Sterile Production Facilities
19 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Production suspended in two facilities.


NCI opens online platform to submit ideas about research for Cancer Moonshot
18 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Submissions will be considered by a panel of scientific experts and patient advocates.


Healthy diet may reduce high blood pressure risk after gestational diabetes, ...
18 Apr 2016 at 8:00pm
Women who have had gestational diabetes may indeed benefit from a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.


NIH launches research program to reduce health disparities in surgical outcomes
18 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
The initiative will involve collaborations among several NIH institutes and centers, AHRQ.


Islet transplantation restores blood sugar awareness and control in type 1 di...
18 Apr 2016 at 2:00pm
NIH-funded study lays groundwork for potential application submission to FDA for licensure of islet preparation.


Greenness around homes linked to lower mortality
15 Apr 2016 at 4:00pm
Researchers found the biggest differences in death rates from kidney disease, respiratory disease, and cancer.


NIH sequences genome of a fungus that causes life-threatening pneumonia
11 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
Pneumocystis was one of the first infections that led to the initial recognition of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.


New role identified for scars at the site of injured spinal cord
7 Apr 2016 at 7:00pm
NIH-funded mouse study suggests scar formation may help, not hinder, nerve regrowth.


NIH Announcements

NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA)
Weekly Funding Opportunities and Policy Notices from the National Institutes of Health.

Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Conformanc...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:52am
Notice NOT-FD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Reminder: NHLBI FY2017 Small Business Topics of Special Interest (TOSI) for t...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:48am
Notice NOT-HL-16-479 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of Extension of the Expiration Date for PA-16-282 Developing New Clini...
12 Dec 2016 at 1:25am
Notice NOT-HS-17-005 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of an Informational Webinar for RFA-NS-17-017 "Frontotemporal Degenera...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:09am
Notice NOT-NS-17-010 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Pragmatic Clinical Trials Demonstr...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit UG3/UH3 phased cooperative agreement research applications to conduct efficient, large-scale pragmatic clinical trial Demonstration Projects within the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other co-morbid conditions in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. This program will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program. Awards made under this FOA will initially support a two-year milestone-driven planning phase (UG3), with possible transition to a pragmatic trial Demonstration Project implementation phase (UH3). UG3 projects that have met the scientific milestone and feasibility requirements may transition to the UH3 phase. The UG3/UH3 application must be submitted as a single application, following the instructions described in this FOA. The overall goal of this initiative, jointly supported by the NIH, DoD, and VA, is to develop the capacity to implement cost-effective large-scale clinical research in military and veteran health care delivery organizations focusing on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other comorbid conditions. The NIH, DoD, and VA expect to: establish a Coordinating Center that will provide national leadership and technical expertise for all aspects of health care system (HCS_- focused research including assistance to UG3/UH3 grant applicants. Primary outcomes of treatment interventions include assessing pain and pain reduction, ability to function in daily life, quality of life, and medication usage/reduction/discontinuation. Secondary outcomes focusing on assessing comorbid conditions or those co-occurring with high frequency in this population are also of interest under the FOA.
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Coordinating Center (U24)
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit applications for a Coordinating Center (CC) to provide national leadership for the NIH-DoD-VA Health Care Systems (HCS) Research Collaboratory program on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and comorbidities in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. For brevity, this initiative will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory. Coordinating Center applicants will need to: 1) develop, adapt, and adopt technical and policy guidelines and best practices for the effective conduct of research in partnership with health care systems focused on military personnel, veterans, and their families; 2) work collaboratively with and provide technical, design, and other support to Demonstration Project teams, to develop and implement a pragmatic trial protocol; and 3) disseminate widely Collaboratory-endorsed policies and best practices and lessons learned in the Demonstration Projects for implementing research within health care settings. The Coordinating Center will also serve as the central resource for the activities of the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program, including providing administrative support for a Steering Committee and its subcommittees.
Innovations for Healthy Living - Improving Population Health and Eliminating ...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes and in preventing disease and improving health in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Technologies for Improving Minority Health and Eliminating Health Disparities...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Novel Analytical Approaches for Metabolomics Data (R03)
12 Dec 2016 at 9:57am
Funding Opportunity RFA-RM-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this small research grant Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to foster collaboration between computational scientists, metabolomics experts, and biomedical researchers in developing, piloting, and/or validating novel bioinformatic approaches that address current analytical hurdles in metabolomics data. A goal of providing powerful approaches that will be useful to biomedical researchers, as well as bioinformaticians, is particularly encouraged. Projects are not intended to supplement ongoing metabolomics analyses, but to provide a tool for broader use by the biomedical research community. Projects are expected to use existing, publicly available metabolomics data and complement the efforts and resources of the Common Fund Metabolomics Program.
Utilizing Health Information Technology to Scale and Spread Successful Practi...
12 Dec 2016 at 10:39am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-077 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites R18 grant applications for research that demonstrates how health information technology (IT) can improve patient-centered health outcomes and quality of care in primary care and other ambulatory settings through the scale and spread of successful, health IT-enabled practice models that use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to achieve these objectives.
Administrative Supplement for Research on Sex/Gender Influences (Admin Supp)
12 Dec 2016 at 1:27am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-078 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) announces the availability of administrative supplements to support research highlighting the impact of sex/gender influences and/or sex and gender factors in human health and illness, including basic, preclinical, clinical and behavioral studies. Of special interest are studies relevant to understanding the significance of biological sex on cells and tissue explants; comparative studies of male and female tissues, organ systems and physiological systems; sex-based comparisons of pathophysiology, biomarkers, gene expression, clinical presentation and prevention and treatment of diseases. The most robust experimental designs include consideration of both sex and gender; therefore, applications proposing to investigate the influence of both sex and gender factors are highly encouraged. The proposed research must address at least one objective from Goals 1 through 3 of the NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research.
Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 10:19am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-074 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $50,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $600,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 11:23am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-075 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-funded investigators to purchase or upgrade scientific instruments necessary to carry out animal experiments in all areas of biomedical research supported by the NIH. Applicants may request clusters of commercially available instruments configured as specialized integrated systems or as series of instruments to support a thematic workflow in a well-defined area of research using animals or related materials. Priority will be given to specialized clusters of instruments and to uniquely configured systems to support innovative and potentially transformative investigations. Requests for a single instrument will be considered only if the instrument is to be placed in a barrier facility. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) supports requests for state-of-the art commercially available technologies needed for NIH-funded research using any vertebrate and invertebrate animal species. It is expected that the use of the awarded instruments will enhance the scientific rigor of animal research and improve the reproducibility of experimental outcomes. One item of the requested instrumentation must cost at least $50,000. No instrument in a cluster can cost less than $20,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $750,000.
High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 12:15pm
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-076 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $600,001. The maximum award is $2,000,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffraction systems, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and confocal microscopes, cell-sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Increasing the Use of Medications for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders ...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:26am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-079 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages health services research designed to increase the public health impact of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for the treatment of alcohol use disorder. Significant progress is needed in developing generalizable, scalable, cost-effective strategies to move these evidence-based interventions into the mainstream of alcohol use disorder treatment, in both general medical and specialty care settings. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) seeks applications to conduct hypothesis-driven research to identify effective methods for increasing the utilization of currently-available medications, by addressing their acceptability (to prescribers and patients), perceived effectiveness, affordability, and feasibility of use within existing care delivery systems.