Aging, Longevity and Health in the News


Nature: Current issue


Scientific American: Current issue


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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Impact of sampling strategies and reconstruction protocols in nasal airflow s...
by Andreȷ A. Evteev, Yann Heuze
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
In their study, de Azevedo et al. (1) employ a sample of 12 individuals from Argentina of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean origin [northeastern Asians (NEA)] as representative of cold-adapted populations. However, all previous literature on the subject shows that the craniofacial morphology of these po...
Reply to Evteev and Heuze: How to overcome the problem of modeling respiratio...
by S. de Azevedo, M. F. Gonzalez, C. Cintas, V. Ramallo, M. Quinto–Sanchez, F. Marquez, T. Hunemeier, C. Paschetta, A. Ruderman, P. Navarro, B. A. Pazos, C. C. Silva de Cerqueira, O. Velan, F. Ramirez–Rozzi, N. Calvo, H. G. Castro, R. R. Paz, R. Gonzalez–Jose
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
Evteev and Heuzé (1) state that there is no evidence supporting that Chinese, Japanese, and Korean populations exhibit cold-adaptation features. However, several facial traits present in these groups were previously interpreted as cold-climate adaptations (2?9). For instance, a composite sample that...
New explanation for the longevity of social insect reproductives: Transposabl...
by Eric R. Lucas, Laurent Keller
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
The increasing frailty that accompanies old age deeply influences our lives and permeates our thoughts. As a result, studies tackling this topic naturally fascinate both specialists and the general public. However, despite a wealth of research, the fundamental mechanisms of aging remain undetermined...
Strategic investment explains patterns of cooperation and cheating in a micro...
by Philip G. Madgwick, Balint Stewart, Laurence J. Belcher, Christopher R. L. Thompson, Jason B. Wolf
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
Contributing to cooperation is typically costly, while its rewards are often available to all members of a social group. So why should individuals be willing to pay these costs, especially if they could cheat by exploiting the investments of others? Kin selection theory broadly predicts that individ...
Osmotic stabilization prevents cochlear synaptopathy after blast trauma [Medi...
by Jinkyung Kim, Anping Xia, Nicolas Grillet, Brian E. Applegate, John S. Oghalai
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
Traumatic noise causes hearing loss by damaging sensory hair cells and their auditory synapses. There are no treatments. Here, we investigated mice exposed to a blast wave approximating a roadside bomb. In vivo cochlear imaging revealed an increase in the volume of endolymph, the fluid within scala ...
Dopamine receptors mediate strategy abandoning via modulation of a specific p...
by Qiaoling Cui, Qian Li, Hongyan Geng, Lei Chen, Nancy Y. Ip, Ya Ke, Wing-Ho Yung
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
The ability to abandon old strategies and adopt new ones is essential for survival in a constantly changing environment. While previous studies suggest the importance of the prefrontal cortex and some subcortical areas in the generation of strategy-switching flexibility, the fine neural circuitry an...
Early fossil record of Euarthropoda and the Cambrian Explosion [Evolution]
by Allison C. Daley, Jonathan B. Antcliffe, Harriet B. Drage, Stephen Pates
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
Euarthropoda is one of the best-preserved fossil animal groups and has been the most diverse animal phylum for over 500 million years. Fossil Konservat-Lagerstätten, such as Burgess Shale-type deposits (BSTs), show the evolution of the euarthropod stem lineage during the Cambrian from 518 million ye...
Interferometric imaging of nonlocal electromechanical power transduction in f...
by Lu Zheng, Hui Dong, Xiaoyu Wu, Yen-Lin Huang, Wenbo Wang, Weida Wu, Zheng Wang, Keji Lai
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
The electrical generation and detection of elastic waves are the foundation for acoustoelectronic and acoustooptic systems. For surface acoustic wave devices, microelectromechanical/nanoelectromechanical systems, and phononic crystals, tailoring the spatial variation of material properties such as p...
Fully gapped d-wave superconductivity in CeCu2Si2 [Applied Physical Sciences]
by Guiming Pang, Michael Smidman, Jinglei Zhang, Lin Jiao, Zongfa Weng, Emilian M. Nica, Ye Chen, Wenbing Jiang, Yongjun Zhang, Wu Xie, Hirale S. Jeevan, Hanoh Lee, Philipp Gegenwart, Frank Steglich, Qimiao Si, Huiqiu Yuan
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
The nature of the pairing symmetry of the first heavy fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2 has recently become the subject of controversy. While CeCu2Si2 was generally believed to be a d-wave superconductor, recent low-temperature specific heat measurements showed evidence for fully gapped superconductiv...
Wireless, intraoral hybrid electronics for real-time quantification of sodium...
by Yongkuk Lee, Connor Howe, Saswat Mishra, Dong Sup Lee, Musa Mahmood, Matthew Piper, Youngbin Kim, Katie Tieu, Hun-Soo Byun, James P. Coffey, Mahdis Shayan, Youngjae Chun, Richard M. Costanzo, Woon-Hong Yeo
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
Recent wearable devices offer portable monitoring of biopotentials, heart rate, or physical activity, allowing for active management of human health and wellness. Such systems can be inserted in the oral cavity for measuring food intake in regard to controlling eating behavior, directly related to d...
Linked genetic variation and not genome structure causes widespread different...
by Iskander Said, Ashley Byrne, Victoria Serrano, Charis Cardeno, Christopher Vollmers, Russell Corbett-Detig
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
Chromosomal inversions are widely thought to be favored by natural selection because they suppress recombination between alleles that have higher fitness on the same genetic background or in similar environments. Nonetheless, few selected alleles have been characterized at the molecular level. Gene ...
Artificial selection reveals sex differences in the genetic basis of sexual a...
by Thomas P. Gosden, Adam J. Reddiex, Stephen F. Chenoweth
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
Mutual mate choice occurs when males and females base mating decisions on shared traits. Despite increased awareness, the extent to which mutual choice drives phenotypic change remains poorly understood. When preferences in both sexes target the same traits, it is unclear how evolution will proceed ...
Longevity and transposon defense, the case of termite reproductives [Evolution]
by Daniel Elsner, Karen Meusemann, Judith Korb
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
Social insects are promising new models in aging research. Within single colonies, longevity differences of several magnitudes exist that can be found elsewhere only between different species. Reproducing queens (and, in termites, also kings) can live for several decades, whereas sterile workers oft...
Acquisition of virulence genes by a carrier strain gave rise to the ongoing e...
by Ola Bronstad Brynildsrud, Vegard Eldholm, Jon Bohlin, Kennedy Uadiale, Stephen Obaro, Dominique A. Caugant
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
In the African meningitis belt, a region of sub-Saharan Africa comprising 22 countries from Senegal in the west to Ethiopia in the east, large epidemics of serogroup A meningococcal meningitis have occurred periodically. After gradual introduction from 2010 of mass vaccination with a monovalent meni...
Reducing resistance allele formation in CRISPR gene drive [Genetics]
by Jackson Champer, Jingxian Liu, Suh Yeon Oh, Riona Reeves, Anisha Luthra, Nathan Oakes, Andrew G. Clark, Philipp W. Messer
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
CRISPR homing gene drives can convert heterozygous cells with one copy of the drive allele into homozygotes, thereby enabling super-Mendelian inheritance. Such a mechanism could be used, for example, to rapidly disseminate a genetic payload in a population, promising effective strategies for the con...
Deubiquitinating enzyme USP3 controls CHK1 chromatin association and activati...
by Yu-Che Cheng, Sheau-Yann Shieh
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
Checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1), a Ser/Thr protein kinase, is modified by the K63-linked ubiquitin chain in response to genotoxic stress, which promotes its nuclear localization, chromatin association, and activation. Interestingly, this bulky modification is linked to a critical residue, K132, at the ki...
Transcriptomic context of DRD1 is associated with prefrontal activity and beh...
by Leonardo Fazio, Giulio Pergola, Marco Papalino, Pasquale Di Carlo, Anna Monda, Barbara Gelao, Nicola Amoroso, Sabina Tangaro, Antonio Rampino, Teresa Popolizio, Alessandro Bertolino, Giuseppe Blasi
22 May 2018 at 12:06pm
Dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) signaling shapes prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity during working memory (WM). Previous reports found higher WM performance associated with alleles linked to greater expression of the gene coding for D1Rs (DRD1). However, there is no evidence on the relationship between gen...

Science

[Research Articles] Targeted inhibition of histone H3K27 demethylation is eff...
by Lochmann, T. L., Powell, K. M., Ham, J., Floros, K. V., Heisey, D. A. R., Kurupi, R. I. J., Calbert, M. L., Ghotra, M. S., Greninger, P., Dozmorov, M., Gowda, M., Souers, A. J., Reynolds, C. P., Benes, C. H., Faber, A. C.
16 May 2018 at 1:50pm

High-risk neuroblastoma is often distinguished by amplification of MYCN and loss of differentiation potential. We performed high-throughput drug screening of epigenetic-targeted therapies across a large and diverse tumor cell line panel and uncovered the hypersensitivity of neuroblastoma cells to GS...


[Research Articles] The protective role of macrophage migration inhibitory fa...
by Stoppe, C., Averdunk, L., Goetzenich, A., Soppert, J., Marlier, A., Kraemer, S., Vieten, J., Coburn, M., Kowark, A., Kim, B.-S., Marx, G., Rex, S., Ochi, A., Leng, L., Moeckel, G., Linkermann, A., El Bounkari, O., Zarbock, A., Bernhagen, J., Djudjaj, S., Bucala, R., Boor, P.
16 May 2018 at 1:50pm

Acute kidney injury (AKI) represents the most frequent complication after cardiac surgery. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a stress-regulating cytokine that was shown to protect the heart from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, but its role in the pathogenesis of AKI remains unk...


[Research Articles] Targeted complement inhibition salvages stressed neurons ...
by Alawieh, A., Langley, E. F., Tomlinson, S.
16 May 2018 at 1:50pm

Ischemic stroke results from the interruption of blood flow to the brain resulting in long-term motor and cognitive neurological deficits, and it is a leading cause of death and disability. Current interventions focus on the restoration of blood flow to limit neuronal death, but these treatments hav...


[Research Articles] PGD2/DP2 receptor activation promotes severe viral bronch...
by Werder, R. B., Lynch, J. P., Simpson, J. C., Zhang, V., Hodge, N. H., Poh, M., Forbes-Blom, E., Kulis, C., Smythe, M. L., Upham, J. W., Spann, K., Everard, M. L., Phipps, S.
9 May 2018 at 1:50pm

Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) signals through PGD2 receptor 2 (DP2, also known as CRTH2) on type 2 effector cells to promote asthma pathogenesis; however, little is known about its role during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis, a major risk factor for asthma development. We show that RSV inf...


[Research Articles] TLR7 agonists induce transient viremia and reduce the vir...
by Lim, S.-Y., Osuna, C. E., Hraber, P. T., Hesselgesser, J., Gerold, J. M., Barnes, T. L., Sanisetty, S., Seaman, M. S., Lewis, M. G., Geleziunas, R., Miller, M. D., Cihlar, T., Lee, W. A., Hill, A. L., Whitney, J. B.
2 May 2018 at 1:50pm

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can halt HIV-1 replication but fails to target the long-lived latent viral reservoir. Several pharmacological compounds have been evaluated for their ability to reverse HIV-1 latency, but none has demonstrably reduced the latent HIV-1 reservoir or affected viral rebound ...


The first horse herders and the impact of early Bronze Age steppe expansions ...
by de Barros Damgaard, P., Martiniano, R., Kamm, J., Moreno-Mayar, J. V., Kroonen, G., Peyrot, M., Barjamovic, G., Rasmussen, S., Zacho, C., Baimukhanov, N., Zaibert, V., Merz, V., Biddanda, A., Merz, I., Loman, V., Evdokimov, V., Usmanova, E., Hemphill, B., Seguin-Orlando, A., Yediay, F. E., Ullah, I., Sjögren, K.-G., Iversen, K. H., Choin, J., de la Fuente, C., Ilardo, M., Schroeder, H., Moiseyev, V., Gromov, A., Polyakov, A., Omura, S., Senyurt, S. Y., Ahmad, H., McKenzie, C., Margaryan, A., Hameed, A., Samad, A., Gul, N., Khokhar, M. H., Goriunova, O. I., Bazaliiskii, V. I., Novembre, J., Weber, A. W., Orlando, L., Allentoft, M. E., Nielsen, R., Kristiansen, K., Sikora, M., Outram, A. K., Durbin, R., Willerslev, E.
9 May 2018 at 12:50pm

The Yamnaya expansions from the western steppe into Europe and Asia during the Early Bronze Age (~3000 BCE) are believed to have brought with them Indo-European languages and possibly horse husbandry. We analyze 74 ancient whole-genome sequences from across Inner Asia and Anatolia and show that the ...


Single-proton spin detection by diamond magnetometry
by Loretz, M., Rosskopf, T., Boss, J. M., Pezzagna, S., Meijer, J., Degen, C. L.
8 Jan 2015 at 2:55pm

Extending magnetic resonance imaging to the atomic scale has been a long-standing aspiration, driven by the prospect of directly mapping atomic positions in molecules with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We report detection of individual, isolated proton spins by a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center...


A Single Molecular Spin Valve
by Schon, Emberly, Kirczenow
18 Apr 2002 at 2:53pm

The charge transport through a single benzene-1,4-dithiolate molecule embedded in an inert matrix of insulating alkanethiol molecules and sandwiched between ferromagnetic electrodes is studied as a function of magnetic field. Electronic transport through the device structure shows a pronounced spin ...



British Medical Journal


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Maura Lynch: fistula fighter and nun
by Joanna Lyall
23 Mar 2018 at 8:21am
When Maura Lynch entered the order of the Medical Missionaries of Mary two days before her 18th birthday, she was hoping to spend her life serving poor populations in Africa. By the time of her death...
Dyslipidaemia and cardiovascular risk
by Aidan Ryan, Simon Heath, Paul Cook
23 Mar 2018 at 7:06am
What you need to knowFull lipid profile (total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, and triglyceride) is necessary for the diagnosis of hypercholesterolaemiaAsk about a...

New England Journal of Medicine


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Biomarkers and Aging in the News

An egg a day to keep the doctor away?
A study in China suggests a daily egg may reduce the risk of a stroke
21 May 2018 at 8:28pm
Johnson & Johnson hit with $25.75 million verdict in talc-asbestos case
A California jury hit Johnson & Johnson and other companies with a $25.75 million verdict, saying the company was negligent and did not warn consumers about possible health risks from its Baby Powder.
24 May 2018 at 6:52pm
Why you should start eating the Nordic diet
You are probably familiar with the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and olive oil. The diet has been associated with a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease, cancer and Type 2 diabetes, as well as a reduced risk of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. But there's another diet that has its roots overseas, and it appears to offer similar health benefits.
23 May 2018 at 4:49am
Younger American women more likely to get lung cancer than men
Historically, men have been more likely to develop lung cancer than women in the United States, but new research indicates that this sex-based trend has flipped, with the greatest shift occurring among whites and some Hispanics born after the mid-1960s. Overall, younger women are now more likely to get lung cancer than men of the same age, the study authors say.
24 May 2018 at 1:27pm

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The New Health Care: What Barbershops Can Teach About Delivering Health Care
One reason that an experiment to reduce high blood pressure in a high-risk population succeeded is that it adapted its approach to encourage trust.
21 May 2018 at 5:00am
Trilobites: The Thing Inside Your Cells That Might Determine How Long You Live
You may have forgotten about the nucleolus since you took biology class, but scientists think this structure inside every cell in your body may play an important role in aging.
20 May 2018 at 12:52pm

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Melanoma cases rising; young women at greatest risk
Study says that could be because they are more likely to use tanning beds than men.        
2 Apr 2012 at 10:15am
Long use of any hormones raises women's breast cancer risk
A new study tracked about 60,000 nurses and found that use of any kind of hormones for 10 years or more slightly raised the chances.        
1 Apr 2012 at 1:28pm
Radiation may up breast cancer risk in some women
Mammograms might raise the chances of developing cancer in young women whose genes put them at higher risk, a study suggests.        
6 Sep 2012 at 6:30pm
U.N.: Chemicals damaging health and environment
The report by the U.N. Environment Program warned that the increasing production of chemicals is increasing health costs.        
6 Sep 2012 at 11:25am
Study: Ginkgo doesn't prevent Alzheimer's disease
Taking ginkgo biloba didn't prevent Alzheimer's disease in older adults, according to the biggest prevention study in Europe.       
5 Sep 2012 at 10:34pm
University pulls Kinsey Institute app over privacy concerns
The Kinsey Institute released a new mobile app that allows users to report on sexual behavior and experiences.       
5 Sep 2012 at 9:43pm
War might be making young bodies old
A VA study finds that veterans in their 20s and 30s show signs of premature aging.       
5 Sep 2012 at 5:56pm

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Express Scripts to limit opioid prescriptions
Move by largest pharmacy benefits manager to lower addiction risks of painkillers draws objections from AMA
16 Aug 2017 at 7:15pm
Why is knee arthritis twice as common as it used to be?
It's estimated that the lifetime risk of developing the condition is 46 percent
15 Aug 2017 at 3:51pm
Why are cases of knee osteoarthritis on the rise?
A new study found osteoarthritis of the knee is more than twice as common as it was just a few generations ago. It's estimated the lifetime risk of developing this condition is 46 percent, but it is possible to protect your knees. Dr. Jordan Metzl, a sports medicine physician at New York's Hospital for Special Surgery, joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss possible reasons for the increase and what you can do to reduce the symptoms.
15 Aug 2017 at 1:13pm
An alcoholic drink per day can lower risk of cardiovascular disease, study says
Having a glass of wine or beer with dinner tonight may be good for you, according to a new study. Researchers found women who had up to one drink a day and men who averaged up to two a day had a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. Dr. Jon LaPook explains.
14 Aug 2017 at 11:45pm
Morning Rounds: Colon cancer deaths, stroke rates among women
Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss a surprising and concerning rise in colon cancer death rates among younger Americans, a new study that shows stroke rates are going down for men but not women and a new development in the on-going battle with antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
12 Aug 2017 at 12:48pm
How to protect your eyes while viewing the solar eclipse
Millions of Americans will look at the sky on Aug. 21 for the first coast-to-coast total eclipse of the sun in 99 years. But if you want to catch a glimpse, you should take precautions to avoid damaging your vision. Ophthamologist Dr. Christopher Starr joins "CBS This Morning" with more on how to protect your eyes.
11 Aug 2017 at 2:39pm
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm

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The New Health Care: What Barbershops Can Teach About Delivering Health Care
One reason that an experiment to reduce high blood pressure in a high-risk population succeeded is that it adapted its approach to encourage trust.
21 May 2018 at 5:00am
Trilobites: The Thing Inside Your Cells That Might Determine How Long You Live
You may have forgotten about the nucleolus since you took biology class, but scientists think this structure inside every cell in your body may play an important role in aging.
20 May 2018 at 12:52pm
From local collective behavior to global migratory patterns in white storks

Soaring migrant birds exploit columns of rising air (thermals) to cover large distances with minimal energy. Using social information while locating thermals may benefit such birds, but examining collective movements in wild migrants has been a major challenge for researchers. We investigated the group movements of a flock of 27 naturally migrating juvenile white storks by using high-resolution GPS and accelerometers. Analyzing individual and group movements on multiple scales revealed that a sm...


24 May 2018 at 1:41pm
RNA buffers the phase separation behavior of prion-like RNA binding proteins

Prion-like RNA binding proteins (RBPs) such as TDP43 and FUS are largely soluble in the nucleus but form solid pathological aggregates when mislocalized to the cytoplasm. What keeps these proteins soluble in the nucleus and promotes aggregation in the cytoplasm is still unknown. We report here that RNA critically regulates the phase behavior of prion-like RBPs. Low RNA/protein ratios promote phase separation into liquid droplets, whereas high ratios prevent droplet formation in vitro. Reduction ...


24 May 2018 at 1:41pm
Low-Fat Diet Tied to Better Breast Cancer Survival
Data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study had already found that women who ate a low-fat diet were at lower odds of developing more aggressive forms of breast cancer.
24 May 2018 at 4:15pm
Severe Eczema May Be Linked to Heart Disease Risk
Because this was an observational study, the researchers couldn't prove eczema caused the increased heart disease risk. But they said that, given the large number of people included in the study, the association appears strong.
24 May 2018 at 2:15pm
Heavier Women May Face Higher Cancer Risks: Study
Although the study couldn't prove cause and effect, obesity was tied to a rise in the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer by 20 percent and kidney cancer by 95 percent.
24 May 2018 at 10:15am
FDA Takes Action Against Teething Products, Makers
The FDA previously warned consumers about the risks of benzocaine, which includes a risk of developing a disease known as methemoglobinemia, which can raise the levels of methemoglobin in the blood while dangerously lowering blood oxygen levels.
23 May 2018 at 5:29pm
Don?t Scramble Diet Over Eggs and Heart Study
In the study, eating an egg daily lowered the odds of dying from heart disease by 18% and cut the risk of hemorrhagic stroke by 28%, when compared with those who never, or rarely, ate eggs.
22 May 2018 at 5:10pm
Race May Play Role in Kids' Suicide Risk
Among kids aged 5 to 17, about 1,660 black children took their own lives, versus 13,300 whites, the findings showed.
21 May 2018 at 2:15pm
Lower Vitamin D levels Linked to More Belly Fat
Low vitamin D levels have been linked to poor bone health, as well as increased risk for respiratory infection, autoimmune disorders and heart disease.
21 May 2018 at 2:15pm
Screenings Miss Signs of Autism, Especially in Girls
Girls with autism, in particular, have different social behaviors that could mask their disorder, the researchers found.
21 May 2018 at 10:15am

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Dentists can smell your fear ? and it may put your teeth at risk
A study of sweaty T-shirts suggests dentists can smell when someone is anxious, and it makes them more likely to make mistakes and damage neighbouring teeth
25 May 2018 at 7:46am
Babies should mix with other children to lower leukaemia risk
Cancer researcher Mel Greaves has suggested that a lack of exposure to microbes in a baby?s first year can make children more likely to get a form of leukaemia
21 May 2018 at 2:00pm

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Exercising Less Than 20 Minutes A Day Linked To Shorter Lifespan
Moderate-to-vigorous physical activities can reduce mortality, even if they are accumulated in short bursts instead of one concentrated session.
26 Mar 2018 at 1:13am
Grilled Meat, High-Heat Cooking Raise Risk Of High Blood Pressure
A new study suggested consuming meat cooked using high-temperature methods could lead to a 17 percent increased risk of high blood pressure.
23 Mar 2018 at 6:00am
Flu Can Increase Heart Attack, Stroke Risk, Study Claims
The risks of heart attack and stroke rise in the week after a flu infection, particularly among older people and those with pre-existing heart conditions.
22 Mar 2018 at 7:15am
Minimizing Health Risks In Flights: Taking The Window Seat And Other Tips
Jet lag, bacterial infections, and blood clots are just a few of the possible health risks of air travel. Here are some effective steps you can take to prevent them.
21 Mar 2018 at 6:00am
How Safe Is Abortion In The US, And What Are The Risks?
In addition to a new landmark report, we look at other science and evidence-based studies to answer important questions about abortion.
19 Mar 2018 at 7:00am
Hitting Puberty Early Could Increase Obesity Risk As Adults For Women
Research from the U.K. adds insight into an underlying causal link, suggesting that early puberty has a significant impact on a woman's risk of obesity.
16 Mar 2018 at 8:00am

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School Safety Tips For Younger Kids
School is back in session, so take some time to go over these important safety tips with your children. This is just the beginning of the conversation, but it's a great place to get started.
21 Jul 2014 at 8:00am
Low-Fat Diet Tied to Better Breast Cancer Survival
Data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study had already found that women who ate a low-fat diet were at lower odds of developing more aggressive forms of breast cancer.
24 May 2018 at 4:15pm
Severe Eczema May Be Linked to Heart Disease Risk
Because this was an observational study, the researchers couldn't prove eczema caused the increased heart disease risk. But they said that, given the large number of people included in the study, the association appears strong.
24 May 2018 at 2:15pm
Heavier Women May Face Higher Cancer Risks: Study
Although the study couldn't prove cause and effect, obesity was tied to a rise in the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer by 20 percent and kidney cancer by 95 percent.
24 May 2018 at 10:15am
FDA Takes Action Against Teething Products, Makers
The FDA previously warned consumers about the risks of benzocaine, which includes a risk of developing a disease known as methemoglobinemia, which can raise the levels of methemoglobin in the blood while dangerously lowering blood oxygen levels.
23 May 2018 at 5:29pm
Don?t Scramble Diet Over Eggs and Heart Study
In the study, eating an egg daily lowered the odds of dying from heart disease by 18% and cut the risk of hemorrhagic stroke by 28%, when compared with those who never, or rarely, ate eggs.
22 May 2018 at 5:10pm
Race May Play Role in Kids' Suicide Risk
Among kids aged 5 to 17, about 1,660 black children took their own lives, versus 13,300 whites, the findings showed.
21 May 2018 at 2:15pm
Lower Vitamin D levels Linked to More Belly Fat
Low vitamin D levels have been linked to poor bone health, as well as increased risk for respiratory infection, autoimmune disorders and heart disease.
21 May 2018 at 2:15pm
Screenings Miss Signs of Autism, Especially in Girls
Girls with autism, in particular, have different social behaviors that could mask their disorder, the researchers found.
21 May 2018 at 10:15am
Medigap supplemental coverage can be too pricey for younger Medicare benefici...
One night three years ago, Joe Hobson finished reading a book, went to sleep and woke up blind. The problem, caused by a rare hereditary disease, forced him to give up his 20-year communications job, along with its generous health insurance. Now 63, the Arlington man is covered by Medicare, the f...
7 Mar 2011 at 6:32pm
Type 2 diabetes surges in people younger than 20
U.S. cases in those under 20 have grown from almost zero to tens of thousands in just over a decade.
22 Mar 2011 at 3:48pm
Fear is potent risk of Japanese nuclear crisis
The psychological impact of Japanese nuclear crisis could turn out to be significant
15 Mar 2011 at 5:31am
How men and women exercise differently
No one wants to think she's a cliche. But it's time for me to recognize that when it comes to my gym behavior, that's exactly what I am: a cardio-loving woman who has to be forced to hoist a dumbbell.
1 Mar 2011 at 11:59am
Many Americans have poor health literacy
An elderly woman sent home from the hospital develops a life-threatening infection because she doesn't understand the warning signs listed in the discharge instructions. A man flummoxed by an intake form in a doctor's office reflexively writes "no" to every question because he doesn't understand ...
28 Feb 2011 at 8:37pm
'Policy Review' essay covers PTSD; veteran benefits
How could a Veterans Administration rule making it easier for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder to file disability claims be a bad thing? In a "Policy Review" essay called "PTSD's Diagnostic Trap," psychiatrist and Yale University School of Medicine lecturer Sally Satel argues that ful...
21 Feb 2011 at 11:47am
Women are more likely than men to give up sleep to care for children and others
Call it the real night shift - that noctural period when bleary-eyed adults leave warm beds to tend to the needs of sick kids, elderly parents, an ailing spouse or incontinent pet. So, who takes the night shift: Mom or Dad?
14 Feb 2011 at 8:22pm
Enrollment in high-risk insurance pools lagging behind predictions
More Americans have been signing up for special health plans designed for people with medical problems that caused them to be spurned by the insurance industry, according to new government figures. But enrollment continues to lag significantly behind original predictions.
10 Feb 2011 at 9:35pm

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Trilobites: The Thing Inside Your Cells That Might Determine How Long You Live
You may have forgotten about the nucleolus since you took biology class, but scientists think this structure inside every cell in your body may play an important role in aging.
20 May 2018 at 12:52pm
Weight-loss surgery is associated with a reduced risk of melanoma, researcher...

In addition to rapid and lasting weight loss and a passel of other health benefits, bariatric surgery has now been linked to a 61% reduction in the risk of developing malignant melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer most closely associated with excessive sun exposure.

The new research, to be presented...


23 May 2018 at 8:35pm

NIH Press Releases



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NIH News Release
NIH News Release
News releases from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Affective neuroscience expert Dr. Richard Davidson to speak on meditation res...
20 Apr 2016 at 1:00pm
NCCIH presents ?Change Your Brain by Transforming Your Mind?.


NIH study finds factors that may influence influenza vaccine effectiveness
19 Apr 2016 at 8:30pm
Long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited.


Statement on Review of NIH Sterile Production Facilities
19 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Production suspended in two facilities.


NCI opens online platform to submit ideas about research for Cancer Moonshot
18 Apr 2016 at 8:15pm
Submissions will be considered by a panel of scientific experts and patient advocates.


Healthy diet may reduce high blood pressure risk after gestational diabetes, ...
18 Apr 2016 at 8:00pm
Women who have had gestational diabetes may indeed benefit from a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.


NIH launches research program to reduce health disparities in surgical outcomes
18 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
The initiative will involve collaborations among several NIH institutes and centers, AHRQ.


Islet transplantation restores blood sugar awareness and control in type 1 di...
18 Apr 2016 at 2:00pm
NIH-funded study lays groundwork for potential application submission to FDA for licensure of islet preparation.


Greenness around homes linked to lower mortality
15 Apr 2016 at 4:00pm
Researchers found the biggest differences in death rates from kidney disease, respiratory disease, and cancer.


NIH sequences genome of a fungus that causes life-threatening pneumonia
11 Apr 2016 at 3:00pm
Pneumocystis was one of the first infections that led to the initial recognition of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.


New role identified for scars at the site of injured spinal cord
7 Apr 2016 at 7:00pm
NIH-funded mouse study suggests scar formation may help, not hinder, nerve regrowth.


NIH Announcements


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NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA)
Weekly Funding Opportunities and Policy Notices from the National Institutes of Health.

Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Conformanc...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:52am
Notice NOT-FD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Reminder: NHLBI FY2017 Small Business Topics of Special Interest (TOSI) for t...
12 Dec 2016 at 11:48am
Notice NOT-HL-16-479 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of Extension of the Expiration Date for PA-16-282 Developing New Clini...
12 Dec 2016 at 1:25am
Notice NOT-HS-17-005 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
Notice of an Informational Webinar for RFA-NS-17-017 "Frontotemporal Degenera...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:09am
Notice NOT-NS-17-010 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Pragmatic Clinical Trials Demonstr...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit UG3/UH3 phased cooperative agreement research applications to conduct efficient, large-scale pragmatic clinical trial Demonstration Projects within the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other co-morbid conditions in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. This program will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program. Awards made under this FOA will initially support a two-year milestone-driven planning phase (UG3), with possible transition to a pragmatic trial Demonstration Project implementation phase (UH3). UG3 projects that have met the scientific milestone and feasibility requirements may transition to the UH3 phase. The UG3/UH3 application must be submitted as a single application, following the instructions described in this FOA. The overall goal of this initiative, jointly supported by the NIH, DoD, and VA, is to develop the capacity to implement cost-effective large-scale clinical research in military and veteran health care delivery organizations focusing on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and other comorbid conditions. The NIH, DoD, and VA expect to: establish a Coordinating Center that will provide national leadership and technical expertise for all aspects of health care system (HCS_- focused research including assistance to UG3/UH3 grant applicants. Primary outcomes of treatment interventions include assessing pain and pain reduction, ability to function in daily life, quality of life, and medication usage/reduction/discontinuation. Secondary outcomes focusing on assessing comorbid conditions or those co-occurring with high frequency in this population are also of interest under the FOA.
NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory - Coordinating Center (U24)
12 Dec 2016 at 3:33am
Funding Opportunity RFA-AT-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this FOA is to solicit applications for a Coordinating Center (CC) to provide national leadership for the NIH-DoD-VA Health Care Systems (HCS) Research Collaboratory program on non-pharmacological approaches to pain management and comorbidities in U.S. military personnel, veterans and their families. For brevity, this initiative will be referred to as the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory. Coordinating Center applicants will need to: 1) develop, adapt, and adopt technical and policy guidelines and best practices for the effective conduct of research in partnership with health care systems focused on military personnel, veterans, and their families; 2) work collaboratively with and provide technical, design, and other support to Demonstration Project teams, to develop and implement a pragmatic trial protocol; and 3) disseminate widely Collaboratory-endorsed policies and best practices and lessons learned in the Demonstration Projects for implementing research within health care settings. The Coordinating Center will also serve as the central resource for the activities of the NIH-DoD-VA Pain Management Collaboratory program, including providing administrative support for a Steering Committee and its subcommittees.
Innovations for Healthy Living - Improving Population Health and Eliminating ...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes and in preventing disease and improving health in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Technologies for Improving Minority Health and Eliminating Health Disparities...
12 Dec 2016 at 12:04pm
Funding Opportunity RFA-MD-17-002 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites eligible United States small business concerns (SBCs) to submit Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant applications that propose to develop a product, process or service for commercialization with the aim of reducing disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes in one or more NIH-defined health disparity population group(s). Appropriate technologies should be effective, affordable, culturally acceptable, and deliverable to racial/ethnic minorities, low-income and rural populations.
Novel Analytical Approaches for Metabolomics Data (R03)
12 Dec 2016 at 9:57am
Funding Opportunity RFA-RM-17-001 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this small research grant Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to foster collaboration between computational scientists, metabolomics experts, and biomedical researchers in developing, piloting, and/or validating novel bioinformatic approaches that address current analytical hurdles in metabolomics data. A goal of providing powerful approaches that will be useful to biomedical researchers, as well as bioinformaticians, is particularly encouraged. Projects are not intended to supplement ongoing metabolomics analyses, but to provide a tool for broader use by the biomedical research community. Projects are expected to use existing, publicly available metabolomics data and complement the efforts and resources of the Common Fund Metabolomics Program.
Utilizing Health Information Technology to Scale and Spread Successful Practi...
12 Dec 2016 at 10:39am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-077 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites R18 grant applications for research that demonstrates how health information technology (IT) can improve patient-centered health outcomes and quality of care in primary care and other ambulatory settings through the scale and spread of successful, health IT-enabled practice models that use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to achieve these objectives.
Administrative Supplement for Research on Sex/Gender Influences (Admin Supp)
12 Dec 2016 at 1:27am
Funding Opportunity PA-17-078 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) announces the availability of administrative supplements to support research highlighting the impact of sex/gender influences and/or sex and gender factors in human health and illness, including basic, preclinical, clinical and behavioral studies. Of special interest are studies relevant to understanding the significance of biological sex on cells and tissue explants; comparative studies of male and female tissues, organ systems and physiological systems; sex-based comparisons of pathophysiology, biomarkers, gene expression, clinical presentation and prevention and treatment of diseases. The most robust experimental designs include consideration of both sex and gender; therefore, applications proposing to investigate the influence of both sex and gender factors are highly encouraged. The proposed research must address at least one objective from Goals 1 through 3 of the NIH Strategic Plan for Women's Health Research.
Shared Instrumentation Grant (SIG) Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 10:19am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-074 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $50,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $600,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 11:23am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-075 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-funded investigators to purchase or upgrade scientific instruments necessary to carry out animal experiments in all areas of biomedical research supported by the NIH. Applicants may request clusters of commercially available instruments configured as specialized integrated systems or as series of instruments to support a thematic workflow in a well-defined area of research using animals or related materials. Priority will be given to specialized clusters of instruments and to uniquely configured systems to support innovative and potentially transformative investigations. Requests for a single instrument will be considered only if the instrument is to be placed in a barrier facility. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) supports requests for state-of-the art commercially available technologies needed for NIH-funded research using any vertebrate and invertebrate animal species. It is expected that the use of the awarded instruments will enhance the scientific rigor of animal research and improve the reproducibility of experimental outcomes. One item of the requested instrumentation must cost at least $50,000. No instrument in a cluster can cost less than $20,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $750,000.
High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program (S10)
12 Dec 2016 at 12:15pm
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-076 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $600,001. The maximum award is $2,000,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffraction systems, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and confocal microscopes, cell-sorters, and biomedical imagers.
Increasing the Use of Medications for the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders ...
12 Dec 2016 at 3:26am
Funding Opportunity PAR-17-079 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages health services research designed to increase the public health impact of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for the treatment of alcohol use disorder. Significant progress is needed in developing generalizable, scalable, cost-effective strategies to move these evidence-based interventions into the mainstream of alcohol use disorder treatment, in both general medical and specialty care settings. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) seeks applications to conduct hypothesis-driven research to identify effective methods for increasing the utilization of currently-available medications, by addressing their acceptability (to prescribers and patients), perceived effectiveness, affordability, and feasibility of use within existing care delivery systems.